Monday, 26 April 2010 14:37 The Guitar Hero Series: John Horne
Written by Ava

The Guitar Hero series on Jemsite features interviews with guitarists and musicians who may not have star status YET, but their current situations have shaped them to be who they are--determined, fond of their craft, and heroes in their own right.  Perhaps you'll see in these upcoming entries the next Jimi Hendrix, Melissa Etheridge, or Duane Allman.  Or perhaps they'll become household names by doing what they do best--ripping a mean riff!

John Horne is quite the well-rounded guitarist and for many reasons. While he's a  soloist, who uses a fingerstyling technique, he flows with jazz tunes and standards rather than the typical rock genre.  Even more so, he doesn't really stick to any genre and is quite open to a variety of tunes--making him the kind of guy you could rock to at a concert, dance to at your wedding, or swing your body to in a mellow club with soft lights.

Beyond that, however, John Horne doesn't even get the most satisfaction out of performing. It's teaching, which he does in between gigs, that gives him the best feeling of all, AND it's a way to get feedback for his performances at the same time.

Let's find out about John and what else makes him stand out from the rest.

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Wednesday, 21 April 2010 14:41 An Intro to Modes
Written by Roger
When I was younger and first heard about 'modes,’ the concept seemed very confusing to me.  As I learned more about them though, I realized that the modes were not as complicated as they first seemed to be.   I thought I would write an article to help explain what these scales are and how they can be used.

So, what exactly are ‘modes’? Modes are a set of scales that are related because they are all made up of the exact same group of notes.  The only difference between modes is that each one begins on a different note of the notes from the group.  Because any scale can be started on any of its notes, every scale can be thought of as having modes.  But, when someone says ‘the modes,’ they are usually talking about the modes of the major scale.  The modes of the major scale then are a set of scales that all contain the exact same notes as the major scale, but each start on a different note of the scale.  Since every major scale has seven notes, every major scale has seven modes.  Think of the seven notes of the major scale as being numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7.  The first mode, which is called the Ionian mode, is the major scale itself and starts on 1.  The second mode, which is called the Dorian mode, would start on 2 and would go:  2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 2. In the key of C, for example, the first mode starts on the note C and is C Ionian.  The second mode starts on the note D, which is the second note, and is D Dorian.
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Sunday, 11 April 2010 11:12 The Guitar Hero Series: Mike Baggetta
Written by Ava

The Guitar Hero series on Jemsite features interviews with guitarists and musicians who may not have star status YET, but their current situations have shaped them to be who they are--determined, fond of their craft, and heroes in their own right.  Perhaps you'll see in these upcoming entries the next Jimi Hendrix, Melissa Etheridge, or Duane Allman.  Or perhaps they'll become household names by doing what they do best--ripping a mean riff!

While we here at Jemsite often hamper on the best Ibanez and JEM guitarists and the rock gods of our generation, we've realized that all guitar and music genres should be exemplified to the best of our ability.  After all, well all know it's not easy playing guitar, whether it's flamenco or rock, acoustic or rhythmic. 

So for that matter, we've gone ahead and featured some of our favorites in other categories--from blues to jazz One such performer is guitarist Mike Baggetta, who's been called this generation's most original jazz improvisers and composers.  He's received awards for his talent and is involved in more than one group including Mike Baggetta Quartet and a duo called Tin/Bag.  He's performed and recorded with countless great musicians and entertainers and currently lives in the self-proclaimed capital of great music: New York City! 

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Wednesday, 24 March 2010 16:00 Rambling Man
Written by Ava
Tim's not a guitar player.  But please don't let that dissuade you from reading this piece, because you'll surely regret it.

That's because Tim knows what he's talking about when it comes to modern classical music, including the presence of guitars in this genre.  His musical influences include everything from Miles Davis to Monteverdi, but just as well, he's also a passionate classical music aficionado, a freelance writer and editor, and a blogger.  He's putting together a manuscript for the Concise Oxford Dictionary of Music and somehow manages to find time in his incredibly busy schedule to write for his blog, The Rambler, which he's had online since 2003.  

A guitar player, he's not, but he's surely a music expert.

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Tuesday, 23 March 2010 12:11 The Guitar Hero Series: Ernesto Schnack
Written by Ava

The Guitar Hero series on Jemsite features interviews with guitarists and musicians who may not have star status YET, but their current situations have shaped them to be who they are--determined, fond of their craft, and heroes in their own right.  Perhaps you'll see in these upcoming entries the next Jimi Hendrix, Melissa Etheridge, or Duane Allman.  Or perhaps they'll become household names by doing what they do best--ripping a mean riff!

It's hard enough moving music scenes from New York to Baltimore, but how does a guitar player deal with Berlin, Germany, and a long stint in Panama.  Ask Ernesto Schnack.  The versatile guitar player was born and raised in Panama, but opted to move to Berlin in hopes of finding a bigger audience for his music.  Of course, his father is German, so you'd think he'd have an easy time fitting in.

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Wednesday, 17 March 2010 09:23 Becoming A Versatile Guitarist
Written by Corey
Becoming a versatile guitarist involves plenty of practice and knowledge of theory behind music. Many people think that memorizing chords and looking up guitar tabs online will make them become the next Jimi Hendrix. Only using these references will not make some a versatile guitar player. Any amount knowledge in music theory will help to create a talented musician.

One extremely important part guitar playing is learning scales. There are four types of scales that the majority of guitarists play while on stage. They are the major, minor, pentatonic and blues scales. Each scale has a significant pattern that moves to different areas on the fretboard depending on the key it is played in. By knowing any of these scales, a future musician already has a good grip on playing guitar. Famous guitarists such as Eric Clapton only play guitar solos on the blues scale. 

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