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  #46  
Old 01-22-2013, 08:20 AM
pawel  is offline
 
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Re: Who is the Guitar's most valuable endorser?


I don't have numbers to back it up, but I would imagine there are two profitable market segments:

- Low-end/entry-level, where teenagers save up pocket money or get their parents to buy them a guitar that's similar to what their favourite bands play. This is a low-value, high-volume market segment.

- The high end, where (usually) men in their 30s, 40s, and 50s with white collar jobs and some disposable income decide to finally get "pro-level" equipment that they couldn't afford when they were younger and are generally inspired by guys they listened to in their teens and 20s. If you look at the first wave of boutique gear, some of it catered to "contemporary" players (Soldano, Bogner, Tom Anderson etc.) but a lot of it (Fender Custom Shop, Fulltone) was very much directed at people who grew up on Hendrix, Clapton, Beck, and Page. This is a pretty big group of people that does have money. It is changing, slowly, as those raised on EVH, George Lynch, Vai, Metallica or even Grunge slowly enter this market.

To whoever has said that they don't think anyone buys Clapton Strats compared to Jems and EBMM JPs, I wouldn't be so sure. When that guitar was introduced Clapton was still a charting pop artist but at that time far from a guitar god to teenagers (in '88 kids wanted Charvels, Kramers, Jacksons, RGs) and that guitar was already targeted at the higher-end older market. I don't think that has changed drastically since and given how much of a household name Clapton is and how widely recognised Strats are, I would imagine its sales still dwarf those of signature Ibanezes.

To answer the question - a valuable endorser has to either shift a huge volume of guitars in the first low-end market or attract steady sales in the high-end market. I don't think many of the contemporary artists who help sell the cheaper guitars have enough staying power, so my bet would be on some of the big older names: Clapton, Hendrix, Page or some of the big hitters from the 80s and 90s (SRV, EVH, Hetfield). I think in the big scheme of things, compared to these names, guys like Satriani, Vai, and Petrucci are still a bit "niche".
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  #47  
Old 02-12-2013, 09:59 PM
psychoshredder  is online
 
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Re: Who is the Guitar's most valuable endorser?


i don't know much about today's guitar hero, as my hero is always from the 80.
yeah same old story.
but back in the day when I started plating guitar, lucky me I never wanted anything related to my hero.
I love ibanez when I saw the RG with sharktooth at some magazine.
since that day I knew I want that guitar no matter who's playing it.

the only signature guitar that gets my attention is nuno N4.
I don't like Nuno's playing, as I don't listen to extreme as well, but his guitar is pretty interested to me.

and as a long time and big die hard fan of ibanez guitar, I never ever owned a jem.LOL.
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  #48  
Old 02-15-2013, 11:25 AM
63Blazer  is offline
 
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Re: Who is the Guitar's most valuable endorser?


Though I am not a Les Paul guy I think for a large general public approach to reaching the most people, Slash and his Gibson and Epiphone Les Paul signature models have a lot of appeal. Guitar players like us may enjoy Petrucci or Satch, but they are not as well known to non-guitar players.

If I were not a guitar player but was on the fence about getting into it like potentially millions of kids and young adults are right now, I would recognize Slash way before someone like Satch. Not knowing what equipment, strings, or parts were best, it helps if I could attach a product with a known star.

I am thinking about saxophone/trumpet and while a lot of the really, really expensive brands and models either don't have endorsers or to players that trumpet players only seem to know, it helps if a popular trumpet player (let's say Miles) is out there pulling for a common Conn or Yamaha trumpet targeted for students.

So back to Slash, while I know there are a lot of great and superior boutique strings, he does pretty much endorse the least expensive string out there, Ernie Ball and partly because they could pay him really well for that endorsement. In reality it wouldn't surprise me if he actually used an expensive boutique string. He also endorses Gibson and Epiphone but actually uses a luthier built, one of a kind Les Paul replica which costs much more than the actual Gibson or Epiphone he endorses in the magazines. If we wanted to have that actual luthier build one like his, we would probably have to wait in a long line and then probably couldn't afford it anyway. Clapton long endorsed his signature model but for years he played his priceless pre-CBS black strat which is the type that could fetch fifty grand without star provenance. It was only after he fully retired it that he started using his namesake strats.

Endorsing is a business venture and can have very little to do with if the endorser actually uses the product.
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  #49  
Old 02-15-2013, 11:48 AM
63Blazer  is offline
 
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Re: Who is the Guitar's most valuable endorser?


Quote:
Originally Posted by The Euphor View Post
Les Paul has been the best signature to put on an instrument so far. I think it will stay that way for a few more years.
I don't think he as a player had a big impact on young rock and roll kids who wanted to buy that model. I would give more credit to guys like Bloomberg and Clapton in the 1960s using Les Pauls and making that a go-to electric guitar and serious competition to the Fenders which dominated the market in rock.

When Les came out with his guitar, it was very futuristic and I think the average jazz band player still stuck with their trusty hollobody instruments. Remember that the Les Paul Model came out in 1952, a good several years before rock and roll.

It was only years after Clapton, Bloomberg, Jimmy Page, Ace Frehley, and other rock heroes with Les Pauls that I actually got to hear Les Paul's actual early, pre-rock and roll guitar work. He was amazing but not something I was interested in when I got my first Les Paul guitar.
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  #50  
Old 02-15-2013, 01:17 PM
Ibateur  is offline
 
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Re: Who is the Guitar's most valuable endorser?


The Euph did say best signature....
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  #51  
Old 02-15-2013, 01:53 PM
63Blazer  is offline
 
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Re: Who is the Guitar's most valuable endorser?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibateur View Post
The Euph did say best signature....
That's true. Actually I didn't know there was an actual Les Paul the person, Lester Polsfuss, until many years later.

I can't think of another signature other than "Fender" from Leo Fender but what appears to his actual signature differs than the stylized script on the neck that we all know. He did have a guitar that had what appears to be his actual check writing signature as a special model on a Broadcaster (below).

Paul Reed Smith guitars looks like a signature on the headstock but that could also be some artist's rendition script. If that were my actual signature, it would be tiresome to write something that elaborate every time I signed a check or contract. Most signatures I see are too unattractive to be put on headstocks.

http://www.elderly.com/vintage/items/30U-12848.htm
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  #52  
Old 02-15-2013, 02:37 PM
jono  is offline
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Re: Who is the Guitar's most valuable endorser?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Ibateur View Post
The Euph did say best signature....
and this thread was supposed to be about guys who were still with us to actually make the endorsement deal, rather than "the estate of..."
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  #53  
Old 02-15-2013, 06:56 PM
GUITARMAGEDDON  is offline
 
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Re: Who is the Guitar's most valuable endorser?


EVH..
he turned electric guitar into a sport.

He pretty much invented DIY guitar modding...
Striped guitars
Brown sound
Tapping
floyd rose trems...
D-tuna
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  #54  
Old 02-15-2013, 09:33 PM
63Blazer  is offline
 
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Re: Who is the Guitar's most valuable endorser?


Quote:
Originally Posted by GUITARMAGEDDON View Post
EVH..
he turned electric guitar into a sport.

He pretty much invented DIY guitar modding...
Striped guitars
Brown sound
Tapping
floyd rose trems...
D-tuna
Actually I guess before Slash, Eddie was the big deal and arguably even bigger than anybody except for Jimi Hendrix.

I know at one time most of us played something with one, two or three names on the headstock and pretty much stock with maybe the addition of a form fitting aftermarket pickup.

Eddie really did open up the DIY can of worms at the same time as the Floyd craze which still dominates a lot of guitar models. For a few years, or at least until Nirvana, superstrats (including many DIY partscasters) with Floyds was standard gear for rock and roll. It got to the point I saw jazz players and top 40 bands with guitarists sporting the superstrats and Floyds, even if they never used the trem. If anything, it became comfortable stringing up any guitar locking down the bridge and nut, and then forgetting about ever having to tune the guitar. But it also made things inconvenient when one lost a wrench. Those were fun days though and kept the guitar from completely getting swallowed up by synths in that decade.

So by the time grunge came along, and Guns and Roses just a few years earlier, it was nice to simply pick up a guitar and not have to worry about Floyds and the pyrotechnic playing that came along with it. It lost being fun when it got to having to read actual music and start approaching the seriousness of Bach related passages which were commonplace with Floyds and speedy riffs. It seemed to get too serious on technique (for me at least) and taken away from the core of a song.
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  #55  
Old 02-18-2013, 02:28 AM
psychoshredder  is online
 
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Re: Who is the Guitar's most valuable endorser?


well.... make justin bieber plays guitar and make a signature of it. it would be like a hotcake
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