Neck Joint Types

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 Ibanez Necks Specs & Woods

JEM Neck Joints

All Access Neck

Original Neck

The All Access Neck is on the left, while the Original Heel Joint is on the right. You will see that the newer All Access Neck allows for much better access to the upper frets without being hindered by the bulky, square heel joint.


AANJ: 555

The 555 features a similar but not exactly identical all-access-neck joint. Pictured here is a JEM555BK


Universe Neck Joint Types

All Access Neck

Original Neck

The All Access Neck is on the left, while the Original Heel Joint is on the right. The newer All Access Neck allows for much better access to the upper frets without being hindered by the bulky, square heel joint.


Neck Types: All Access Neck vs Original Neck

In each of the pictures above, the Original neck is on top and the All Access Neck on the bottom. The fretboard lengths are the same in both, but the necks vary in where they attach to the body. Notice that the original neck's base was shorter, with the fretboard extending out to fit the body. The original body had less routing, whereas the new All Access Neck requires deeper body routing up to the neck pickup. On the All Access Neck, the additional neck wood is needed to allow it to be bolted closer to the bridge. The Heel Joint on the Original necks are at the 16th fret and the neck thickens at the 12th fret. The Heel Joint on the All-Access-Neck is at the 17.5th fret and the neck thickens at the 16h fret. You cannot retrofit an original neck into an all access body. You could however, retrofit an all access neck into an original style body with heavy modifications of the body first.


Neck Joint - Common Surface Crack


Common on Ibanez (and other brand) guitars with the old neck joint (aka strat 4-bolt heel) is a surface crack in the paint that appears at the neck joint as shown in the photos. The crack begins at the angle of the pocket and can extend and spider a fraction of an inch up to an inch or more. These are pretty much "normal" and something that is not unexpected. This is partially a problem with the paint, which is not given sufficient time to cure as it adheres to a high-stress area of wood. The only concern is a deep crack from damage that is not just from the paint, but through the body wood. Removal of the neck and examining the raw, unpainted wood in the pocket would eliminate any guess work as to possible damage.

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