Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one? - Jemsite
Off-topic / Miscellaneous Talk about miscellaneous stuff off-topic and not related to music, guitars or bands. No music, gear or anything guitar related here please.

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-13-2014, 02:31 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northern California
Posts: 2,511
Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

I have been on and off in computers and feel burned out.

I have thought about social work, and while many positions want a BA or master's it pays stupidly low and I would have to go back to school in a social work/psychology program.

It's so low in my area, though there's a need, that San Jose type high tech jobs, in a business one owns, can bill out as much in a weekend as a social worker makes in a year.

While I never feel like I helped anybody or society with my knowledge of high tech, a social worker is an occupation which has a rewarding aspect to it. But the vast financial difference can sway me against it.

Has anybody made a similar move from relative security (and plentiful work out there) to something almost free (well, like leaving a nice white collar job in order to only play bars and weddings with your Ibby?).

Thoughts?
63Blazer is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-13-2014, 02:57 PM
 
Join Date: Mar 2013
Location: Charleston, SC
Posts: 80
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

Have you thought about keeping your job and doing social work on the side? There are a lot of ways to help your community without starting a new career.
CrazyDean is offline  
post #3 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-13-2014, 04:08 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northern California
Posts: 2,511
Unhappy Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

Quote:
Originally Posted by CrazyDean View Post
Have you thought about keeping your job and doing social work on the side? There are a lot of ways to help your community without starting a new career.
I thought about that.

I can make my living doing 'puters but help (for free) the MD's office that sends out volunteers to get to the numerous young vets under the bridge to seek medical care they are entitled to. There has always been a small homeless population here, and mostly of those long term older folk who choose the lifestyle in many cases. But in the last decade, most are vets and not always in the best way mentally with PTSD being the major culprit. I cannot even begin to tell you how bad or widespread it is and one marine friend of mine who spent three tours in Vietnam told me what he sees is worse now (at least in Monterey County, CA).

It's not easy, and many would rather drink themselves to death or eat meth for breakfast, and even when the bennies are there, it's a different story to make people use them. It's akin to having a mentally ill person off their meds get convinced to start taking them again.

The heartbreak of social work, especially with many who don't want you around, would maybe be too hard for me to do long term.

What's ironic is that in most cases the homeless population here have more income from checks they get each month, or twice a month, than what social workers here make. But the state of mind of many of the homeless people make the money irrelevant with the pull of illegal drugs. I am convinced many who are on the street now in that vicious cycle wouldn't be if they had housing and meds, but trying to hook people up, even if free, is like a camel through the eye of a needle trick.
63Blazer is offline  
post #4 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-13-2014, 05:06 PM
Vendor
 
Rich's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 25,517
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

People usually get philanthropic after they've made a safe retirement for themselves. If you're there then by all means, do all the good you can handle. On the other hand if you haven't made bank yet, I would chose full time money and part time social service, until you can afford to give all your time away.
Rich is offline  
post #5 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-13-2014, 05:37 PM
Super Moderator
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: England
Posts: 6,967
Reviews: 1
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

Rich offers the best setup in the business and the best advice in this thread. Unless you can maintain your (and your family's) desired lifestyle without your high paying full time job, it's probably not a good idea.

I think it was Michael Caine that said...

"I've tried being poor. And I've tried being rich. Rich is better"
jono is offline  
post #6 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-13-2014, 05:47 PM
 
CosmicDebris's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Richmond VA, USA
Posts: 3,980
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

Yea, it was a move to parenthood.
CosmicDebris is offline  
post #7 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-13-2014, 11:47 PM
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Houston
Posts: 69
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

I'm about to.

I own my own business, but I'm about to finish my degree in Special Education, so I'll be selling the business and going back to working for the Man.

I'll be taking a pay cut, but it's something I've always wanted to do, and I'm finally in the position to make it happen.

Good luck in whatever you decide!
Blacksunshine is offline  
post #8 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 12:16 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northern California
Posts: 2,511
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

Sometimes when you see friends die, and I lost a few in a very short period of time, it makes you think about the bigger things. Some had money and some didn't, but all were taken away far too early, or far earlier than they or anybody else expected. It didn't buy any of them an extra day.

These were people I saw, at least five of six, within months or even weeks of their early exit, and all this in a town of 1,600 people. Let that sink in if you could imagine a town that small, and one square mile, and then one after another just dies (super rare form of ALS for one otherwise healthy man, old age for another who was the town's kindergarten teacher so that wasn't a shock, sudden aneurism for lady who was friends with both those two, heart attack in rehab for young man who was son of ALS man, death from a minor operation on knee to one we all knew who would hang out in front of local grocery store and panhandle money by telling jokes, and another heart attack in ambulance from the local homeless man we all knew.) I knew all these people and they all knew each other. Small town.

I don't know if this urgency to do something worthwhile will last or if it is only a reaction to seeing six months and six deaths. Prior to that in my town, I may hear of maybe one death a year on average (in last few decades) from somebody I knew and it was usually somebody very old who lived a full life and not robbed early like five of six were.
63Blazer is offline  
post #9 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 01:13 AM
Vendor
 
Rich's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 25,517
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

Noble causes no doubt, you should devote as much time to it you want to. You're doing it as much to feel good about doing it as you are to help somebody else. Anybody that takes a pay cut to follow a chosen path must have a good enough reason to do it.

Blackson, that's awesome. My dad was a special ed teacher. It takes a special kind of patience to do that well. To bad I didn't get that gene.
Rich is offline  
post #10 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 07:28 AM
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Dalton GA
Posts: 246
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

I did. After 15 years as an automotive technician, I took a job as an automotive technology teacher at a local high school. I was tired of seeing the dealership I worked at hire people who barely had any clue about auto repair. That was 10 years ago. The school I work at is a charter school so I did not have to have a teaching certificate to be hired. After two years, I decided to get my certificate. Now I can teach at any school in GA.

As far as pay, I am still making less a little less than I made at the dealership. The benefits are state retirement and insurance. To stay current in the industry, I work every other Saturday and most of the summer at the dealership.

I would recommend teaching. It is rewarding to see former students in the work force. Some even earn more than I did, which is great. I have had a student place third in SkillsUSA (a club like FFA) at the national level. That is something I or he will never forget.

Some people think teaching is easy with a lot of time off. The first three years were extremely hard. I had never, at that point, had one teaching class, but now I know what works and the best ways to present the materials to students with different learning styles. And as for time off, teachers are contracted for so many days. The local school boards sets the school calendar. If a teacher is doing his or her job correctly, they will be working at home and on weekends grading papers and planning assignments. You almost have to just to keep up.

Good luck on what ever you decide.
Angra1 is offline  
post #11 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 09:46 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northern California
Posts: 2,511
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich View Post
Noble causes no doubt, you should devote as much time to it you want to. You're doing it as much to feel good about doing it as you are to help somebody else. Anybody that takes a pay cut to follow a chosen path must have a good enough reason to do it.

Blackson, that's awesome. My dad was a special ed teacher. It takes a special kind of patience to do that well. To bad I didn't get that gene.
Thanks for the support, Rich. I have to admit between the burnout yet the endless opportunities (and headaches) of IT/high tech/computers AND the amazing set of losses this town has suffered, I "got" that gene to help but was probably not born with it. I leave it to the more noble people out there who have done it for years and would do it for free.

None of us (99.9 % percent) are going to be financially set in most of norcal, short of being a CEO of a tech company, but it's more just keeping up with bills. We have the highest real estate outside of Jupiter, FL, highest gas prices, highest utilities, and highest food prices, etc in the USA. Whether you make 20 grand or 200 grand, you can't touch a house anywhere near here. You have to be the 2/3rds of the American millionaires who were basically born that way. Ask anybody in the city, or in Woodside, Atherton, Palo Alto, etc. In other regions within the state, Sacto for example, you can get a high paying job with good bennies yet work into an affordable home. But San Jose and most cities nearby, no way in hades.

_______

Angra1 Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?


I did. After 15 years as an automotive technician, I took a job as an automotive technology teacher at a local high school. I was tired of seeing the dealership I worked at hire people who barely had any clue about auto repair. That was 10 years ago. The school I work at is a charter school so I did not have to have a teaching certificate to be hired. After two years, I decided to get my certificate. Now I can teach at any school in GA.

As far as pay, I am still making less a little less than I made at the dealership. The benefits are state retirement and insurance. To stay current in the industry, I work every other Saturday and most of the summer at the dealership.

I would recommend teaching. It is rewarding to see former students in the work force. Some even earn more than I did, which is great. I have had a student place third in SkillsUSA (a club like FFA) at the national level. That is something I or he will never forget.

Some people think teaching is easy with a lot of time off. The first three years were extremely hard. I had never, at that point, had one teaching class, but now I know what works and the best ways to present the materials to students with different learning styles. And as for time off, teachers are contracted for so many days. The local school boards sets the school calendar. If a teacher is doing his or her job correctly, they will be working at home and on weekends grading papers and planning assignments. You almost have to just to keep up.

Good luck on what ever you decide.


________

Thank you so much, Angra 1. Teaching is a great way to give back and it's more hours and less pay than most outside the field can imagine. My cousin did it for 33 years and after that, continuously, he made less than 33K a year and in Northern California so you could only imagine what that's like. There's no three months off a year in the field, or at least not in my parts where teachers work before school year, after, and most do summer school here or at another district. Some teach at the local junior college, too.

My social work/teaching experience lasted for one day. I took a job teaching at the prison/juvenile hall and all newbies are tasked with working first with the worst offenders first. I was to do a period with Surenos one hour and Nortenos the next but the following week they were going to merge the classes into one. Nobody wanted that task, and from what I knew and saw of those two youth gangs, me neither. I was told from the former teacher, who had been stabbed with the stubby pencils they use in class, that I too would probably get stuck. No thanks, but then again that's social work. One lady I knew who went through that and more loved her job. She moved into children with disabilities (autism and Down's syndrome) and that completely broke her heart and she left the field very depressed. With the gang bangers, you could at least help heal somebody into a workable job, but not with the developmentally disabled kids she got.

Those people who help others, especially for those who have no hope of improvement, are far more patient than me. It's one thing to want to help but another to be able to put up with it with low pay. BTW, teacher in prison was ten dollars an hour, tops, and is probably not much better these days.
63Blazer is offline  
post #12 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 09:47 AM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northern California
Posts: 2,511
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich View Post
Noble causes no doubt, you should devote as much time to it you want to. You're doing it as much to feel good about doing it as you are to help somebody else. Anybody that takes a pay cut to follow a chosen path must have a good enough reason to do it.

Blackson, that's awesome. My dad was a special ed teacher. It takes a special kind of patience to do that well. To bad I didn't get that gene.
Thanks for the support, Rich. I have to admit between the burnout yet the endless opportunities (and headaches) of IT/high tech/computers AND the amazing set of losses this town has suffered, I "got" that gene to help but was probably not born with it. I leave it to the more noble people out there who have done it for years and would do it for free.

None of us (99.9 % percent) are going to be financially set in most of norcal, short of being a CEO of a tech company, but it's more just keeping up with bills. We have the highest real estate outside of Jupiter, FL, highest gas prices, highest utilities, and highest food prices, etc in the USA. Whether you make 20 grand or 200 grand, you can't touch a house anywhere near here. You have to be the 2/3rds of the American millionaires who were basically born that way. Ask anybody in the city, or in Woodside, Atherton, Palo Alto, etc. In other regions within the state, Sacto for example, you can get a high paying job with good bennies yet work into an affordable home. But San Jose and most cities nearby, no way in hades.

_______

Angra1
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?
I did. After 15 years as an automotive technician, I took a job as an automotive technology teacher at a local high school. I was tired of seeing the dealership I worked at hire people who barely had any clue about auto repair. That was 10 years ago. The school I work at is a charter school so I did not have to have a teaching certificate to be hired. After two years, I decided to get my certificate. Now I can teach at any school in GA.


As far as pay, I am still making less a little less than I made at the dealership. The benefits are state retirement and insurance. To stay current in the industry, I work every other Saturday and most of the summer at the dealership.

I would recommend teaching. It is rewarding to see former students in the work force. Some even earn more than I did, which is great. I have had a student place third in SkillsUSA (a club like FFA) at the national level. That is something I or he will never forget.

Some people think teaching is easy with a lot of time off. The first three years were extremely hard. I had never, at that point, had one teaching class, but now I know what works and the best ways to present the materials to students with different learning styles. And as for time off, teachers are contracted for so many days. The local school boards sets the school calendar. If a teacher is doing his or her job correctly, they will be working at home and on weekends grading papers and planning assignments. You almost have to just to keep up.

Good luck on what ever you decide.


________

Thank you so much, Angra 1. Teaching is a great way to give back and it's more hours and less pay than most outside the field can imagine. My cousin did it for 33 years and after that, continuously, he made less than 33K a year and in Northern California so you could only imagine what that's like. Thirty three years to reach thirty three grand. Wow. There's no three months off a year in the field, or at least not in my parts where teachers work before school year, after, and most do summer school here or at another district. Some teach at the local junior college, too.

My social work/teaching experience lasted for one day. I took a job teaching at the prison/juvenile hall and all newbies are tasked with working first with the worst offenders first. I was to do a period with Surenos one hour and Nortenos the next but the following week they were going to merge the classes into one. Nobody wanted that task, and from what I knew and saw of those two youth gangs, me neither. I was told from the former teacher, who had been stabbed with the stubby pencils they use in class, that I too would probably get stuck. No thanks, but then again that's social work. One lady I knew who went through that and more loved her job. She moved into children with disabilities (autism and Down's syndrome) and that completely broke her heart and she left the field very depressed. With the gang bangers, you could at least help heal somebody into a workable job, but not with the developmentally disabled kids she got. From the people I have talked to in the field, you work and hopefully do meaningful work, then you crash and burn out and do something else. There are countless other fields that break their people and that's just a part of life as I have found.

Those people who help others, especially for those who have no hope of improvement, are far more patient than me. It's one thing to want to help but another to be able to put up with it with low pay. BTW, teacher in prison was ten dollars an hour, tops, and is probably not much better these days. I am not kidding when I say "lowest" paying one.

Last edited by 63Blazer; 02-14-2014 at 09:56 AM.
63Blazer is offline  
post #13 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-14-2014, 12:34 PM
site founder 0% owner
 
jemsite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: NJ - USA
Posts: 11,475
Reviews: 1
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

Quote:
Originally Posted by 63Blazer View Post
Sometimes when you see friends die, and I lost a few in a very short period of time, it makes you think about the bigger things. Some had money and some didn't, but all were taken away far too early, or far earlier than they or anybody else expected. It didn't buy any of them an extra day...
Good thread.

What is the point of life to live like an unhappy drone?

Let me premise my brief thoughts in the belief that most people go thru life mostly what i'd call "unaware" like busy-bees or drones. Carrying out meaningless tasks over and over to fit into society (pay bills, etc). That is not a knock but something indoctrinated into us as the absence of this tends to be detrimental to society as a whole. I can digress a little and point out the whole "10 commandments" fable for example to avoid anarchy or worse. People need leaders & rules. Even the heaven fairy-tale required new rules/clauses to keep LIVING people motivated... no "instant entrance" there you need to live a "good life" first (i.e. suicide puts you purgatory/limbo right... a good workaround to make these busy-bee rules make sense.)

Anyways....

IMHO it's clear that anyone who is remotely "aware" would have their perspective altered with the death of friends or a loved one. Take pause in the rat-race & ask "what am i doing?". Of course that is a very, very difficult question sometimes. I would hope people give thought to "what was i here for" on more than one occasion... while not letting that become a burden. Going thru Breaking Bad on Netflix (season 3) there is an interesting episode of this regarding where Hank & Walt's wives come to realize this.

Anyways if you are not married or with young kids then this "change" is more viable and realistic. With every change comes a consequence so it's up to you to manage this & decide. What is good for you might not be good for the next person & vice versa. Good luck! ...glen
jemsite is offline  
post #14 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-17-2014, 04:41 PM
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Washington, DC
Posts: 5,746
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

Leave job for lower paying job...does not compute

My brother and his wife live in the Mission District. They ended up there because she got a scholarship to get a masters in social work at Berkeley. She has her undergrad from University of Wisconsin and they had previously been living in Seattle, where my brother worked for Boeing.

She loves her job and finds it very rewarding but I think it would be pretty tough for them without my brother supporting them. They live in a small, not too great apartment in the Mission, but that's all they can afford. The thing that really drove her to pursuing a masters degree is that she had an extremely hard time finding work with only a BA. I think she was only able to find periodic or part-time work in Seattle, so she mostly worked as a cashier at Trader Joe's.

As part of her free ride at Berkeley, she had to work for the State of California for two years, which she did and now she's re-upped with them. I believe she works in Oakland. But that doesn't mean they pay her more than a pittance to do it. For a dual-income family with no children, her and my brother don't seem to be swimming in money.

My point is know what you're getting into before diving into it. Are you prepared to take on a great deal of debt for schooling? Are you prepared to possibly have to earn an advanced degree just to find consistent employment? Also, while your current job may not be rewarding, is trading that stress for the stress of money struggles a good idea?

Based on everything I read about the labor market, I would absolutely not walk away from good-paying work unless I were financially set. If you walk away and then want to go back after a year, you might find that re-entering your old field is difficult.
Takin' a Ride is offline  
post #15 of 27 (permalink) Old 02-25-2014, 07:15 PM Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northern California
Posts: 2,511
Re: Has anybody ever changed occupations from high paying job to lowest paying one?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Takin' a Ride View Post
Leave job for lower paying job...does not compute

My brother and his wife live in the Mission District. They ended up there because she got a scholarship to get a masters in social work at Berkeley. She has her undergrad from University of Wisconsin and they had previously been living in Seattle, where my brother worked for Boeing.

She loves her job and finds it very rewarding but I think it would be pretty tough for them without my brother supporting them. They live in a small, not too great apartment in the Mission, but that's all they can afford. The thing that really drove her to pursuing a masters degree is that she had an extremely hard time finding work with only a BA. I think she was only able to find periodic or part-time work in Seattle, so she mostly worked as a cashier at Trader Joe's.

As part of her free ride at Berkeley, she had to work for the State of California for two years, which she did and now she's re-upped with them. I believe she works in Oakland. But that doesn't mean they pay her more than a pittance to do it. For a dual-income family with no children, her and my brother don't seem to be swimming in money.

My point is know what you're getting into before diving into it. Are you prepared to take on a great deal of debt for schooling? Are you prepared to possibly have to earn an advanced degree just to find consistent employment? Also, while your current job may not be rewarding, is trading that stress for the stress of money struggles a good idea?

Based on everything I read about the labor market, I would absolutely not walk away from good-paying work unless I were financially set. If you walk away and then want to go back after a year, you might find that re-entering your old field is difficult.
Financially speaking, what you says makes sense.

Oakland is hell in many areas and the Mission District at times is just as bad if not worse. Northern California is expensive and that's why the people who live in low key middle class looking neighborhoods are all doctors, bankers, high tech types, and entrepreneurs as it takes that much money. Social work is tough in that, like MDs, you have to usually have to have 6 years of college with MA, MS, or MSW, then another 3 years of internship before you are licensed. That license usually gets you a middle class job that pays like a plumber, mechanic, deputy DA, small shopkeeper income, or full time teacher salary. With the reduction of income of that 3 years as an intern and typically 6 years as a student (sometimes with student loans), there's a mountain of debt that can take a whole life to pay off. It's a sacrifice many are willing to put up with and a field where there are plenty of social workers glad to take your place if you don't want to help.

In the 2010s, in the height of the recession, there's a record number of social workers and it ties in with the do-gooder ethic that is currently popular with society as a whole. The whole helping hand thing is a pendulum that swings in every generation or so. It's not that it only happens in recessions or good economic times but is a thing that seems to skip generations. One generation is out there picketing, protesting, and being socially progressive while their kids get the good white collar job and are financially responsible and often create new jobs. Their kids may tend to become the social progressives again followed by another that is more traditionally work and money oriented. An interesting thing I heard is you can even get the pulse of society by watching the Miss America Pageant where most will say, "I want to feed starving children in Africa" or alternately in a different time, "I want to start my own big company".

Any social work job, anywhere in the area, just cannot pay enough to have one live in the city, even the Mission District. From the point of view of a social worker, heck, at least living in San Francisco proper is a success story while you do your calling so it's all perspective. There are people who go to Stanford but end up doing good in third world countries or devoting their life to helping those less fortunate just in the Bay Area. No, they probably won't get rich, ever buy a home or new car, but they are a part of the safety net that makes the ghetto that much less dangerous or deadly. Imagine if they weren't here but many don't recognize their need so let's look at an equal need like cops. Imagine, let's say, if the eight dollar an hour cops in many dilapidated urban areas weren't there either like New Orleans or Kansas City. Those cops are certainly not in it for the money.

There are a lot of people (musicians on Jemsite) here who would probably just love to live in a dive in dangerous Hollywood but be in the thick of the music business, even sell a gold record and tour the world, yet still be unable to ever buy a house RATHER THAN having stayed in the burbs or non-musical large city with a cushy job as an insurance salesperson, diner owner, or young attorney. I have a friend who spent his youth touring with the biggest bands around as openers and co-headliners (Metallica, Anthrax, Slayer, Poison, Testament, etc) and selling quite a few records himself, getting to tour Europe, and living every young person's rock and roll fantasy dream. His more practical friends, who were no less talented than him, went to college or got a trade and settled down a lot earlier but would never have the rich experience he had. Now that he's older and has his own business and plays music for fun, I don't think he would trade the decade of living the industry for a head start at a responsible life that would make the parents happy.

Some of us, me included, were the ones who took music a little further than a hobby, and missed out on an early start to a career. Music is a beech that demands 110% percent to even make modest inroads (and same can be said for effective social work) so making money is usually not in the cards. It's a life calling that can last a lifetime, thus usually making you a starving artist/musician, or just five or ten years (where the money is just as elusive).

At the end of the day, it won't be whether you fully paid off your house, student loans, or credit cards that is the issue, but if you lived life with a purpose. If your purpose was to buy a house, get married, and have a rack of kids who get the best clothes, toys, and education then that's a worthy goal in its own right. If your goal is to help those less fortunate than you, and probably taking a job that doesn't compensate you fairly for your headaches in training, heartache, and long hours, then you probably still couldn't imagine doing anything else because that helping spirit was in your soul. And if you are musical and can't imagine doing anything else because it's not only a thing for self expression but as a way of sharing, then that's good, too. Imagine a world without music, or even a record store or iTunes. Some are called to make money as it's needed for all purposes, some are called to help thy brother, and some are called to make music. We are all parts of a body that keeps society going and any lack/shortage in any area would be felt by all in a negative way.

The best thing about the human race is that we all don't want to be the same thing for a living. We always need diversity and change to literally ensure the survival of the human race.

Last edited by 63Blazer; 02-26-2014 at 09:37 AM.
63Blazer is offline  
Reply

Tags
job change , poverty

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Jemsite forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address

IMPORTANT: You will be required to activate your account so please ensure that your email address is correct.

If you do not receive your activation check your spam folder before using the CONTACT US form (at the bottom right of each page).



Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Trems after 2003:Still paying? nienturi Comments to Ibanez 102 05-26-2007 12:52 PM
How Much Are All You UK Buyers Paying for RG2OTH? Passion_and_Warfare All Other Guitars (including Prestige) 25 04-11-2007 09:55 PM
customs duty paying timi_h Off-topic / Miscellaneous 17 02-02-2007 06:06 AM
Found a UV7BK used - How much should I be paying?.... Scott 74 Ibanez JEM, UV, JS & Other Signature Models 8 03-19-2001 10:14 PM

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome