no water heater technology for your home - Jemsite
Off-topic / Miscellaneous Talk about miscellaneous stuff off-topic and not related to music, guitars or bands. No music, gear or anything guitar related here please.

 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 6 (permalink) Old 02-04-2008, 02:51 PM Thread Starter
 
shredmaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,494
no water heater technology for your home

i saw this awhile ago on tv from some home remodeling show and was wondering who has this or knows someone who does. makes a lot of sense to me. thinking of getting it whenever i get some cash to do so. makes sense to only heat the water as needed, instantly, and never running out of hot water, instead of constantly heating large sums of water in a tank that isn't used that much, and wasting energy in doing so.

http://www.gotankless.com/
shredmaster is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 6 (permalink) Old 02-04-2008, 03:10 PM
site founder 0% owner
 
jemsite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: NJ - USA
Posts: 11,475
Reviews: 1
Re: no water heater technology for your home

good idea but has some hiccups. makes no sense to replace a working, good HW heater. the cost will take years to recoup (hot water is a small cost) with large out of pocket expense to purchase & install. you're using hot water all the time at home. the limitations of these are multiple simultaneous hot water sources running at once - some could/will have insufficient hot water (ie. shower and dishwasher on at same time).

gas versions typically need to vent directly outside (might be an issue)

now if you're installing a new energy efficient gas furnace and want to do an instant hot water zone that is another good option. if you need a new HW heater and space is a limiting factor, this is certainly an option to consider... glen
jemsite is offline  
post #3 of 6 (permalink) Old 02-04-2008, 03:13 PM
Vendor
 
Rich's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: South Jersey
Posts: 25,595
Re: no water heater technology for your home

Ditto, being used a lot in new construction but not many are throwing out good HWH's just to change technologies. If it's time to replace the old unit then is the time to make the change.
Rich is offline  
post #4 of 6 (permalink) Old 02-04-2008, 03:22 PM Thread Starter
 
shredmaster's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2001
Location: Chicago
Posts: 2,494
Re: no water heater technology for your home

that's what i thought. mine is perfectly new with no issues. i was looking at it from a cost savings in energy to constantly maintain hot water in a tank all day all year. i don't need to do anything but it looks interesting.
shredmaster is offline  
post #5 of 6 (permalink) Old 02-04-2008, 04:37 PM
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Plano, TX
Posts: 858
Re: no water heater technology for your home

I just bought a tankless one a couple of weeks (after lots of research) ago (after lots of research and talking to master plumbers) to replace my 12-year-old tank water heater.

Like Rich and Glen said, it is highly unlikely that it would make an iota of sense to replace a standard hot water heater just because. The unit is more expensive and the installation is quite a bit more expensive and involved. Most times they have to run new (larger) gas lines and run electricity to where your current hot water heater is, as well as putting a larger (or new) vent on your roof, among other things.

So, given that it costs several hundred dollars more for the unit, and in the neighborhood of $1000 (depending) to install, as Glen pointed out, it would take a looooong time for you to recoup your money in replacing a new or good tank water heater because the annual savings aren't that great. A decent tank water heater that is well-insulated doesn't take a lot of gas to keep the water at temperature.

But if you are a uber-environmentalist, you should try and convince everyone in the world to replace their tank with a tankless so we can all save energy.

Incidentally you can certainly run multiple simultaneous sources at one time (mine will run 3 - the largest one runs 6 or 7) but the more sources you need, the more expensive they get.
gu1tar is offline  
post #6 of 6 (permalink) Old 02-05-2008, 12:39 AM
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Johannesburg, South Africa
Posts: 904
Re: no water heater technology for your home

Quote:
Originally Posted by jemsite View Post
(hot water is a small cost) with large out of pocket expense to purchase & install. you're using hot water all the time at home. the limitations of these are multiple simultaneous hot water sources running at once - some could/will have insufficient hot water (ie. shower and dishwasher on at same time).

gas versions typically need to vent directly outside (might be an issue)
Well, a gas heater/geyser may be relatively cheap, but electric geysers are the story of the month here. The electric utility started 'load shedding' (how's that for trying to make 'blackout' sound planned?) three weeks ago, and then the story came out....

Ten years ago the utility approached the government and told them capacity was shrinking, with a watershed due in 2007. The government told them they could NOT build further plants. The inevitable happened.

Hot water is suddenly a hot topic; the utility is begging people not to use its product (I think their marketing strategy is a bit iffy myself), and energy saving is paramount. Main culprit - you guessed it - geysers. Partial solution - the local authority fits 'ripple units' to every geyser (about 700 000 of them locally) in the system; power usage climbs, a signal is sent down the wiring and they all shut down. Considering the load on the West Coast of the USA, much of Canada (I believe), much of continental Europe and definite burdens almost worldwide, wholesale implementation could save an immense amount of power immediately.

In the meantime, you could - 1. fit a geyser blanket; 2. turn down the maximum temperature, or 3. fit a timer (if it's an electric geyser) - I had the last one in mind anyway, but since it's an electric timer and since we're already experiencing the power cuts, you can probably see why I'm reluctant.

I had relatives in a house that used an in-line water heater and they had their drawbacks. High pressure hot water was out of the question, and at low pressures what came out of the pipes was almost live steam. You had to be very careful and, with children around I thought them pretty dangerous.
DavyH is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Jemsite forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address

IMPORTANT: You will be required to activate your account so please ensure that your email address is correct.

If you do not receive your activation check your spam folder before using the CONTACT US form (at the bottom right of each page).



Email Address:
OR

Log-in











Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome