1964 Jose Ramirez - Jemsite
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post #1 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-28-2002, 12:14 AM Thread Starter
 
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1964 Jose Ramirez

My father, who is now 68, recently decided to put down his Jose Ramirez since he was no longer interested in classical music and purchased a UV777BK, ds-1 and a 120W Vox amp. (Way to go dad!)

Anyway, the Ramirez is now in my possession and he basically told me he would care less of what I did with it. And although it's nice and all, it's really taking up too much space in my office. My question to you is what should I do with it? I have no idea about these guitars so I'm not sure whether it's something worth keeping or if I did decide to sell it, whether it has any resale value. Here's a little info on the guitar:

It's a 1964 Jose Ramirez that was purchased directly from Jose Ramirez in Madrid, Spain sometime during 1965. Needless to say, it was handmade by Ramirez himself. It's the "Blue Label," which I believe is/was the top-of-the-line model. The guitar has been pampered so the condition is pretty good but it does have a crack below the bridge (if that's what it's called on these guitars). I was told that this could be easily fixed.

Any info would be greatly appreciated.

- raijin
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post #2 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-28-2002, 03:48 PM
 
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You poor bastard, I'll take it off your hands for free if you ship it to Sweden...

Seriously, it sounds like you've hit the big one. if you're not going to play it and give it the attention it deserves, I recommend you take it to a high end guitar shop/collector and have them look it over. You could pay a visit to www.guitarsalon.com and have a look at their stock and their prices.

Good luck!

Mikael
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post #3 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 12:29 AM Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for the info! I tried the link and I was at the prices!!! Holy cow!!! LOL I really had no idea. But the information there was very helpful and some of the articles were fascinating to read.

I will probably take my time with the decision though chances are I will let go of the guitar sooner or later. Although I like classical music and wouldn't mind learning to play the guitar, I will probably never get around to it, realisitically speaking. In that case, the guitar would be better off like you say in the hands of someone else who will play it and give it the attention it deserves.

Thanks again for the info.

- raijin
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post #4 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 12:36 AM Thread Starter
 
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And does anyone know where I can get info on the proper maintenance of a classical guitar? As embarrasing as it sounds, I don't even know how to change the strings on it!
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post #5 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 12:46 AM
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Your best dollars will lie with specialist dealers. I know I've read an article on JR in Vintage Guitar mag if there was some way to do a search in their site. I know there used to be a couple specialty classical dealers that would post in the back of VG. Place to start anyway. 64' should be a prime era for a PR. And never neglect keeping an eye for what shows on ebay, only newer classicals on there right now. Here
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post #6 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 12:53 AM
 
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hey raijin: your dad's really cool!!!!
sell that classical and get yourselves a couple of (almost) matching UVMC's!!!!!
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post #7 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 01:14 AM
 
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Call me a sentimentalist if you will, but I say KEEP THE GUITAR!

You have to look at a guitar of this quality as art. I don't think you'd sell a DaVinci drawing - if you were given one, just because you love Picasso.
It would be like Itzak Perlman selling his Stradivarius because he found a cool Electric fiddle at Guitar Center.

The J.Ramirez has been part of your family's artistic heritage for almost 40 years! I'm not sure if you have children or not, but if you do one day, think of your child wanting to learn classical guitar. Think of the same child being presented a 1964 J. Ramirez to learn on.That would be too cool.

Hang on to it for a while. Your father may change his mind and decide he wants to play it again.
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post #8 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 01:24 AM
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All too true, and in that sense it's priceless

And at the very least let him know what you find out and give him the oportunity to have it back, he might apreciate it a little more knowing what he has
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post #9 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 02:16 AM Thread Starter
 
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Rich: Thanks for the tip. Will look into it. And yes, I plan to tell him first before I make any decisions. Afterall, it's been a part of his life for close to 40 years.

Caprile: There' an idea! But ever since he bought his UV, he's been buying guitars left and right. I think he's got like 15 now! He's really having fun with this new area of electric guitar.

ScreamJem7: Thanks for your input. You've got a point there. And I didn't realize the artistic value of this guitar. And yes I have kids so the idea about keeping the guitar for them to play in the future sounds kinda a nice too. I'd be bummed out if they told me, "No dad, that completely sucks! Get me a Jem!" but I still like the idea.

Now, I really need to sit down and think about this! Thanks everyone for your comments. Now, how do I change the strings on this thing....

- raijin
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post #10 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 02:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by raijin
Now, how do I change the strings on this thing....

- raijin
Dad's only a phone call away, bond
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post #11 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 03:41 AM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich
Quote:
Originally Posted by raijin
Now, how do I change the strings on this thing....

- raijin
Dad's only a phone call away, bond
Not really, he moved to Maryland! And you wouldn't believe the long distance charges are here!
But then, I suppose an email couldn't hurt!
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post #12 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-29-2002, 04:01 AM
 
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There seems to be a number of ways to deal with your "new" guitar:

1. Learn to play it and enjoy having a geat guitar. Allthough you won't learn to appreciate it fully for another 5-10 years...

2. Sell it. Since you won't be playing it your self, it's a shame to keep a great instrument hanging on a wall to no use. It is a musical instrument and thus it was meant to be played.

3. Keep it in the familly for sentimental reasons. You never know if you'll want to take it up at a latter point in life, or you'll have kids who will want to play it.

4. Keep it as an investment. It would be a shame not to keep such a valuable piece just because you don't want to play it.

I would go with 1 or 2 and since I play classical guitar myself, I would definitely go with 1.

Also, I don't think it's fair to compare a guitar to a painting. A guitar was meant to be played. It has a lilfe span just like a human. When it's all new and fresh and just off the hands of the luthier it's much like a cild; no one knows exactly how it will turn out, what it will sound like in a couple of years. If it's a good guitar made of good materials it will mature and grow into something nice and, just like a human, it will grow old and die. It will still be playable of course but the big, full, beautifull tone will change for the worse. This is the nature of wood. The purpose (destiny, if you will) of a guitar is to be played.

This, however, is not the nature of a painting. The colours will change a bit over the years but that's all. It's purpose is to be looked at.

Sorry if I got a bit carried away

Mikael
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post #13 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-30-2002, 06:50 AM Thread Starter
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikael Jurman
Sorry if I got a bit carried away

Mikael
No, not all. I admire your passion for music.

I'm still undecided but before I make up my mind, I'm thinking about getting the guitar professionally cleaned and restored if necessary. Is there anything I should keep in mind? Or is restoration a bad idea for these guitars?

And if I decide that I want to learn to play classical guitar, do you think that I can learn on my own? Or is it necessary to have a teacher to teach you from the ground up so you don't get any bad habits?

- raijin
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post #14 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-30-2002, 11:29 AM
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Restoration is a no no. Repair and maintanence is madatory though. Get that crack glued and cleated before it can spread further. With any vintage instrument the rule of thumb is "less is best". Ask around, make sure the luthier that does the repair is not only competent, but respected for his proficiency in the profession.
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post #15 of 16 (permalink) Old 05-30-2002, 04:11 PM
 
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You could learn to play classical on your own i.e. learn to read music, practice scales and so on.

I would recommend you get a teacher. Not only does a teacher stear you away from bad habits such as bad technique and bad eregonomics (how you sit down with your instrument, that's important), but he or she will help you make MUSIC out of the sheet music. Remember that sheet music is like the written word; it will only tell you so much about what is really bieng said. It takes pronounciation, dialects, gestures, maybe even a stutter to get the whole picture. It also saves time geting it right from the start and not having to relearn, for instance, how to do tremolo correctly.

Good luck!

Mikael
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