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post #1 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-19-2012, 10:09 AM Thread Starter
 
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Theory help

I've been playing guitar on and off for 15 years now and no matter how much material I read and study the theory behind it all still eludes me. I get frustrated and give up but my passion for the guitar calls and I always come back. I need some tips to point me in the right direction to understand scales and modes in general. I'm looking to understand the guitar as a whole, not learn a specific style of playing. Although my main influence is Gilmour, also like kenny wayne shepard and alot of bluesy rock type stuff. I can't seem to hit that "oh yea" moment where everything falls into place and makes sense. All the material I find is either too basic or aimed at a specific style. I would be grateful if someone could link me to some info that would help put it all into place. I can make sense of the basics but somewhere in between I get lost in how it all relates..
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post #2 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-19-2012, 10:28 AM
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Re: Theory help

TEACHER.
There are guitar teaches out there for that reason, some people can't communicate to instruments and need a teacher.Some keep buying all kinds of gear but can't make 1 song so instead of wasting money with gear, INVEST money in a teacher.
Besides that there are tons of tabs of any guitarist out there, just download them and practice but the most important, learn how to apply scales (theory)and not only their shapes, you need to make music and not only a bunch of ups and downs, Gilmour has no technique, his playing is 100% about creating melody, once you heard one of his solos, you'll never forget it

Last edited by 6fingers; 06-19-2012 at 10:43 AM.
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post #3 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-19-2012, 03:12 PM
 
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Re: Theory help

Here's a book I recommend often...

http://www.amazon.com/Everything-Mus.../dp/1593376529

It's a pretty good book, in that it starts with the basics, intervals, for example, then works its way up. It touches on major, then minor scales, before even mentioning modes. It tells how to build chords by their type, then talks about progressions.

Bottom line, the book doesn't inundate you early. It starts simple, then uses that simple knowledge for the next step. Good luck!
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post #4 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-19-2012, 06:20 PM
 
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Re: Theory help

Four words - "Metal Method guitar lessons." The best teacher right in your own living room, rewind as much as you need, and for the price of four "guitar teacher lessons" you can get the whole course. I can't say enough about my experience with these lessons.
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post #5 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-19-2012, 08:47 PM
 
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Re: Theory help

Without getting a feel for what you do know, telling you where to start can be difficult.
But here goes-

If we are talking Greek Modes, seven tones (notes) of a Major scale, think of each not becoming tonic or one within each mode.
Mixolydian is a Major scale starting at the fifth note, making the fifth note the Tonic or tonal center of the piece you are playing.

Major Scale C D E F G A B
Mixolydian G A B C D E F

These are the same notes just stating at a different point your think, yes they are the same.
The difference comes in with the rhythm guitar.
If you build a three note chord off of each note of the major scale, you'll find four different types of chords, Major, Minor, Augmented and Diminished.
The easiest examples is the minor vs. Major or relative minor as it is called.
The sixth note in a Major scale is the relative minor.
Major C D E F G A B the sixth note being A for A minor.
If you play a basic chord structure like 1, 4, 5 in C Major, you are playing chords-

1 C Major
4 F Major
5 G Major

In A minor you are playing-

1 A minor
4 D minor
5 E minor

Now the whole feel of 1, 4, 5 feels very different when you listen to it.
When you play this 1, 4, 5 chord structure, you will be able to sense or feel where the music is going because you have listen to this progression many times without even knowing, very common.
In your mind you will be anticipating the music going back to one or tonic.
So if you're playing in a mode like Mixolydian, G A B C D E F, then you will get that same feeling about the G Major chord.
Solos licks and leads tend to fit the music they are played over, if done well.

Record yourself playing a modal chord progression, just three or four chords, or have a friend play it for you.
Then start improvising some leads over the progression.
Don't use licks you have stored up on your head, listen to the chords and feel what is happening.
Let your leads reflect that the feeling of the chord structure.
If you can't get a grasp on the feeling with the guitar, just hum a melody over the chords to get started.
This is what modes are for, changing the feeling of music.
Otherwise we would all be play in C Major all the time and music would be dull.
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post #6 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-19-2012, 11:32 PM
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Re: Theory help

Awesome reply, bud! Hell, I had forgotten some if those--now I have something to relearn.
I love threads like this--even us old farts forget some of the basics.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sebastian View Post
Without getting a feel for what you do know, telling you where to start can be difficult.
But here goes-

If we are talking Greek Modes, seven tones (notes) of a Major scale, think of each not becoming tonic or one within each mode.
Mixolydian is a Major scale starting at the fifth note, making the fifth note the Tonic or tonal center of the piece you are playing.

Major Scale C D E F G A B
Mixolydian G A B C D E F

These are the same notes just stating at a different point your think, yes they are the same.
The difference comes in with the rhythm guitar.
If you build a three note chord off of each note of the major scale, you'll find four different types of chords, Major, Minor, Augmented and Diminished.
The easiest examples is the minor vs. Major or relative minor as it is called.
The sixth note in a Major scale is the relative minor.
Major C D E F G A B the sixth note being A for A minor.
If you play a basic chord structure like 1, 4, 5 in C Major, you are playing chords-

1 C Major
4 F Major
5 G Major

In A minor you are playing-

1 A minor
4 D minor
5 E minor

Now the whole feel of 1, 4, 5 feels very different when you listen to it.
When you play this 1, 4, 5 chord structure, you will be able to sense or feel where the music is going because you have listen to this progression many times without even knowing, very common.
In your mind you will be anticipating the music going back to one or tonic.
So if you're playing in a mode like Mixolydian, G A B C D E F, then you will get that same feeling about the G Major chord.
Solos licks and leads tend to fit the music they are played over, if done well.

Record yourself playing a modal chord progression, just three or four chords, or have a friend play it for you.
Then start improvising some leads over the progression.
Don't use licks you have stored up on your head, listen to the chords and feel what is happening.
Let your leads reflect that the feeling of the chord structure.
If you can't get a grasp on the feeling with the guitar, just hum a melody over the chords to get started.
This is what modes are for, changing the feeling of music.
Otherwise we would all be play in C Major all the time and music would be dull.


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post #7 of 7 (permalink) Old 06-21-2012, 03:24 PM
 
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Re: Theory help

Good refresher really haha I'm going over it too lol
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