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Thread: Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
03-16-2010 03:39 PM
Real_Illusions
Re: Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns

Quote:
Originally Posted by Magical Muffin View Post
Anything that uses the 'poly' prefix HAS to be really sweet
They are, but also, almost useless as they are in the book. A "polyrhythmic scale" in this book, is basically a scale in two octaves, one scale played at a different note value than the other (the book is arranged for piano. Other than the scales list, as these only require one clef) and polytonal scales are the same idea, but two different scales at the same note value. Theyre more to give you an idea of what they sound like and how they match up, and youd use them as a "template".
03-13-2010 02:58 AM
djangomango
Re: Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns

Quote:
Originally Posted by Real_Illusions View Post
Think Buckethead
Buckethead lol. But anyway, sounds interesting, I'm gonna search them in the book. Sounds a cool idea.
03-12-2010 10:48 PM
Magical Muffin
Re: Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns

HUH ?? ;|
03-12-2010 10:26 PM
IbanezFreak777
Re: Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns

MEH !! :P
03-12-2010 10:19 PM
Magical Muffin
Re: Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns

Quote:
Originally Posted by djangomango View Post
I've been improvising over the pentatonic blues scale for ages and since a week or 3 over the Mixolydian scale. Is there another book I can read that fills the gap between improvising (I can do that) and selecting the right scale/chord?
Sounds to me like you're starting to seriously try to experiment, and that's the most important thing to do. Try new stuff, different modes, learn from these books/dvd's. etc. And hopefully your ears and fingers will naturally do the work for you, over time.

This book here sounds really cool, I def gotta check it out. Anything that uses the 'poly' prefix HAS to be really sweet
03-12-2010 05:49 PM
Real_Illusions
Re: Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns

Quote:
Originally Posted by djangomango View Post
What is a 12 tone spiral? Sound extremely interesting to me and I couldn't find anything on google (is that possible after all ?)
Think Buckethead Theyre "spirals" because they converge or diverge, which is to say the intervals get closer or further apart as the lick goes on. An example being:

C B Db Bb D A Eb Ab etc. including all 12 tones. Theres lots, due to octave displacement and such ideas.
03-10-2010 12:41 AM
djangomango
Re: Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns

Quote:
Originally Posted by Real_Illusions View Post
... or a 12 tone spiral, or a mapping of polytonal or polyrhythm scales ...
What is a 12 tone spiral? Sound extremely interesting to me and I couldn't find anything on google (is that possible after all ?)
03-09-2010 01:56 PM
Real_Illusions
Re: Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns

Lots of people wonder about the Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns when they really want a book like you want. Its the worst book you could ever get for your needs. If you want a really funky weird scale, or you want a certain melodic progression, or a 12 tone spiral, or a mapping of polytonal or polyrhythm scales (i didnt even knew these existed before this book) then this book is the one, as its nothing but a big, big list of such things.

Just incase anyone else is wondering
03-09-2010 03:46 AM
SchecterWhore
Re: Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns

Quote:
Originally Posted by whtwlf View Post
I have a book here that i've had for years called "Scales over Chords" and it's whole point is playing lead lines over chord progressions.

Comes with a cd of backing tracks for practice also.

In fact I've just pulled it out to get back into theory in general and playing over progressions in particular.

It's from PRAXIS.

Cheers,
Shane
Sounds like a cool book. I'll have to check that out.
03-08-2010 06:46 PM
whtwlf
Re: Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns

I have a book here that i've had for years called "Scales over Chords" and it's whole point is playing lead lines over chord progressions.

Comes with a cd of backing tracks for practice also.

In fact I've just pulled it out to get back into theory in general and playing over progressions in particular.

It's from PRAXIS.

Cheers,
Shane
03-07-2010 06:15 AM
SchecterWhore
Re: Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns

Quote:
Originally Posted by djangomango View Post
I've seen this book on the internet. User reviews tell this book doesn't explain how to apply scales.
You can find downloadable PDF's of this book for free online. You should know that it is definitely not a starting point, though. The book is pure intellectual masturbation. Not once does it say "play this pattern over X chord".

Quote:
I've been improvising over the pentatonic blues scale for ages and since a week or 3 over the Mixolydian scale. Is there another book I can read that fills the gap between improvising (I can do that) and selecting the right scale/chord?

Something that explains why scales and chords fit together and why certain chords resolve in others.
Get Kostka & Payne's "Tonal Harmony". It's not some Doug Marks DVD, but if you're wanting to know scale-harmony relationships, you're going to have to look into some more serious products, anyway.

I have yet to see a book that ties scalar properties in with harmony to any great effect. I've been thinking of putting one together, with guitarists in mind, but it's a massive undertaking, and I don't have the time this semester.

Inevitably, somebody will mention the Guitar Grimoire books, and while Mr. Kadmon has written a book on "scales and modes", there is very little theory within the book, and where there is theory, it is explained in such a way that I find confusing and unhelpful. I do like the large catalog of scales, though. Unfortunately, there aren't as many as the book makes it look like, as any given page will be full of redundant scale patterns in different positions in every key, which makes up the bulk of the volume.
03-06-2010 04:55 AM
djangomango
Nicolas Slominsky's Thesaurus of scales and melodic patterns

I've seen this book on the internet. User reviews tell this book doesn't explain how to apply scales.

I've been improvising over the pentatonic blues scale for ages and since a week or 3 over the Mixolydian scale. Is there another book I can read that fills the gap between improvising (I can do that) and selecting the right scale/chord?

Something that explains why scales and chords fit together and why certain chords resolve in others.

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