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Hi all. I just picked up my first 7 (an RG7420 I got cheap). The serial number starts with F99, so it's a '99 7620 neck and the guitar was (probably) made in 2000 (since the RG7420 was only made from 2000 to 2002). Anyway, it's one-piece maple with a scarf joint, but no bubinga stripe. This seems odd to me, because I've read that the RG7s had either three-piece maple necks or one-piece with bubinga stripes. Does anyone here have a '99 RG7 neck they could look at for me and tell me what type it is? Do people find multiple-piece maple necks to be more stable than one-piece? Especially flatsawn maple, like the one I have :)

Thanks,
John
 

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Congrats on your RG7. I have a '98 7620 and it has no bubinga stripe.
My S 7420 is a 2000 and it has a bubinga stripe.;)
 

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I have an early 7621 that's got the one piece neck with the scarf joint. I can't speak to this guitar's stability because right now it's in pieces being restored and customized. However, several of my older Ibanez RG's have one piece necks and they're more stable than my 5-pc. Ibanez neck on my '04 RG. If you set the guitar up well, stability won't be a problem.

-R
 

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Flobanez said:
Customizing? What are you doing to it? Post some pics after.;)
Right now it's torn to bits. The body is completely bare and sanded down and the neck has been disassembled... the crapola POS Ibanez fretboard removed and the truss rod is out.

Plans for it are as follows:

1.) A new graphite nut and Hipshot 7-string bridge.
2.) Brazilian bloodwood fretboard I'm hand-making (410mm radius)
3.) Lighter fretwire (no need for jumbo frets on a non-Floyd Rose guitar)
4.) Abalone dot inlays
5.) 4A quilted maple top and matching headstock (I'm dying the face bright blue). I'm doing a custom Ibanez logo with my name on the headstock a la something that'd come from the LACS. You'll have to wait and see, I've already got that part done and it looks cool.
6.) The back of the body will be black. Not sure if I'm going to put a binding on it yet, that depends on how nicely the veneer comes out once installed

That's about it. Should be done in a month or two, time permitting.

[/thread hijack]

-R
 

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giannifive said:
Hi all. I just picked up my first 7 (an RG7420 I got cheap). The serial number starts with F99, so it's a '99 7620 neck and the guitar was (probably) made in 2000 (since the RG7420 was only made from 2000 to 2002). Anyway, it's one-piece maple with a scarf joint, but no bubinga stripe. This seems odd to me, because I've read that the RG7s had either three-piece maple necks or one-piece with bubinga stripes. Does anyone here have a '99 RG7 neck they could look at for me and tell me what type it is? Do people find multiple-piece maple necks to be more stable than one-piece? Especially flatsawn maple, like the one I have :)
Couple things -

1.) my old '99 7620 also had a one-peice maple neck. This was the norm until about '00, as I understand.

2.) Actually, there's no difference between a 7620 neck and a 7420 neck - there was a lot of rumours going around about "7420s with 7620 necks" but really this is because both initially came from the japanese factory, and the necks were interchangeable. It makes sense - if you have one factory already set up to produce 7-string necks, and you want to make a more "affordable" version, you're not going to build a factory from the ground up, are you? So,y ou don';t have a 7420 with a 7620 neck - you have a 7420 with a Ibanez Wizard 7 neck. ;)

3.) Actually, as I understand quartersawn is the one that's supposed to provide the most stability, based on "one peice neck' arguments.

4.) I've heard the relative merits of both debated ad nauseum. On one hand, a laminate neck isn't prone to flexing along the grain in the same way as a single peice neck, and can provide more structural rigidity. On the other hand, laminate necks of different species (or even peices) of wood can expand and contract at different rates, providing less structural rigidity. My personal feelings? I prefer the appearance of a laminate neck, but realistically it's not a holdup either way - if I like a guitar, I'm not going to get too concerned on whether it's a one peice or three peice neck, as a properly built neck made by either method should provide an excellent amount of stability.

-D
 

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Arent (or, werent) all Ibanez japanese necks supposed to be quartersawn maple?

and theres korean 7s, its not a "factory to produce 7 necks"... :? i know theres 7 string Gios, and those necks sure as hell aint japanese...
 

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Both my 99 7620's are one piece, no bubinga. They rule, in all ways you can count or measure. The fretboards aren't the best rosewood I have, but they're the best I've played made after 1980. they have great color, and nice tight grain. You can certainly build a custom around the neck and trem; they're that good.
 

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jim777 said:
Both my 99 7620's are one piece, no bubinga. They rule, in all ways you can count or measure. The fretboards aren't the best rosewood I have, but they're the best I've played made after 1980. they have great color, and nice tight grain. You can certainly build a custom around the neck and trem; they're that good.
So is my '98 7620. Great neck but I have to say that my UV7PWH neck is smoother but the the 7620 neck is comfortable with the AANJ :)
 

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marianozz said:
and theres korean 7s, its not a "factory to produce 7 necks"... :? i know theres 7 string Gios, and those necks sure as hell aint japanese...
Check the dates - back in 99-ish when they were first rolling out the 7420 series, Ibanez was currently only making 7's in Japan. Either way, take a look at the spec sheet here - I GUARANTEE you a 7420 is japanese made. In fact, it's one of the few TRS-equipped japanese ibanezes, and somewhat of a rarity in that regard.

-D
 

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Yeah. I played a 7420 breifly - the bridge was playable, but not inspiring. The Magenta Crush, on the other hand, almsot hurt. ;)
 

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Drew said:
Check the dates - back in 99-ish when they were first rolling out the 7420 series, Ibanez was currently only making 7's in Japan. Either way, take a look at the spec sheet here - I GUARANTEE you a 7420 is japanese made. In fact, it's one of the few TRS-equipped japanese ibanezes, and somewhat of a rarity in that regard.

-D
When I first ordered my S 7420, I had never played a 7420. Just 7620's.
I had a feeling of hope that it was going to be Japanese made. I was right and I was happy. I think the guitar is well made aside from the TRS that well, it's not so bad I guess. A friend of mine who has an S 7420 also says they might be worth a little something because of the rarity. Who know's.
It's definately a great 7-string. I love that bubinga stripe down the neck too and surprisingly the neck is in between my 7620 and UV as far as smootheness in the finish. Not glossy but not nearly bare. :)
 

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The TRS is fine if you're not a Vai-esque divebomber. If you're a casual trem user, a TRS-equipped machine is fine... but if you abuse the tremolo, the TRS is not for you. I have an S470 with the 6-string Lo-TRS. It's fine, but it obviously can't handle the abuse my LPE/EdgePro equipped guitars can. I've heard many times that the OFR is a direct replacement for the TRS system, but I haven't tried it myself nor do I know of its stability once you perform the upgrade.

The 7420 I played was a great entry level guitar, but if I were looking long term, I'd go after a 7620 or UV. Those are professional-grade instruments with top-shelf hardware designed for stability when properly cared for.

-R
 
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