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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an new S470 with the ZR trem, and every time I do up-pulls the whole guitar goes flat. It goes back to be in perfect tune after a divebomb.

Is there any way to get around this? What I've read this is a very common problem with Floyd Rose-equipped guitars.
 

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WOW - You've stretched the strings! That's easy to do. Much easier than slackening them in a dive bomb and returning to pitch.

Other than pre-stretching your strings, or stretching & retuning many times before practice or gig, maybe you should get a Tremsetter? Strat Man Dwight
 

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Actually, it's more common for the guitar to go flat after a dive-bomb or sharp after a pull-up, with the opposite direction putting it back in tune.

Sounds like you either have a loose nut (also known as a crawling nut, but usually you'll go flat after a pull-up then sharp after a dive-bomb but not always).

Check the nut bolts/screws and check the neck screws as well (I refuse to call the neck screws "bolts," they are not bolts, they are wood screws.)

Since this is a ZR trem the usual Floyd Rose physics don't apply to everything. Make sure your bearings at the bridge aren't grinding and you have the bridge balanced properly. If you're using the zero point, or whatever they call it, make sure the springs are balanced correctly according to the instructions in the manual. If you're not using it then you'll just have to make sure everything is tight and nothing is rubbing on the bridge, adding friction.

Mic
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the help, guys. I'll try tightening the nut screws.

FYI: I'm using the Zero Point system, haven't tried it without it. For those of you with experience with the ZR: Does it stay in tune as good without the Zero Point system as it does without it? (sorry for my bad English)
 

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Having not worked on one myself, I can only guess, but it would seem logical that removing the zero-point would be slightly detrimental to the bridge returning to it's "zero-point," hence the name. :)

But, if the bearing are working as they should you should have no more trouble with tuning than with a standard Floyd, and I'd guess even less problems since there's less friction in the bearings than introduced by knife edges. That is, until the bearing start to wear out and they add a good amount of friction. :)

Your English, I must say, is better than that of many I've met here in West Virginia, USA . . . the land of the in-bred and "unedumacated." ;)

Mic
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
MicJustMic said:
Having not worked on one myself, I can only guess, but it would seem logical that removing the zero-point would be slightly detrimental to the bridge returning to it's "zero-point," hence the name. :)
Good point. :D
But, if the bearing are working as they should you should have no more trouble with tuning than with a standard Floyd, and I'd guess even less problems since there's less friction in the bearings than introduced by knife edges. That is, until the bearing start to wear out and they add a good amount of friction. :)
Makes sence. I'll try it out some day and review it if there is any interest. But for now I'm happy. :)
Your English, I must say, is better than that of many I've met here in West Virginia, USA . . . the land of the in-bred and "unedumacated." ;)

Mic
Lol, thanks... I'm at least trying, right?
 
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