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Carlo said:
"Its cool; actually it's so simple. So many people over-design things, and they tend to not work, or break easily. This thing is simple, easy to use, and most important- it works. All the people that want a fixed bridge on their favorite guitar can now get it without buying a new guitar, then when (as we all do!) decide that they really want the tremolo, just loosen two thumbscrews and presto, back to a trem!"

- Jim Donahue (NoahJames Guitars)

Nuff said....end of story!!! 8) :twisted:

http://www.tremol-no.com/endorsees.html
That's a pretty strong endorsment!
 

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I'm very happy for him. I,too have been thinking of something just for my own guitar and then I saw the link to Kevan's device which appears to be anynything I could think of. I'm proud of him for coming up with this and moving ahead with it. I hope to see this really blossom. The availability of this sort of product has the potential to open up the Floyd-based guitar market to other players that would normally not look at such guitars.

Mike 777 Haug
 

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It'd be sweet to get an RG1527, and have the option to use it is as hard tail (like all my other guitars) but then use it the trem when I get the urge. This looks like a very promising piece.
 

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Alright here we go... I got ahold of one of these finally. I made a little page for it here.

picture

And here's my "official" review...

Background:
Seemingly ages ago when my friend Kevan told me he was working on a way to essentially make it possible to turn your tremolo on and off, I thought it was really neat. Honestly, I didn't expect anything to come of it, but I was excited nonetheless. Then one day he told me he had a working version of it. Prototypes were starting to appear in the hands of my fellow guitarists. People I knew were starting to give praise to the device. I was getting more intrigued. The idea is so simple it almost makes you feel stupid for not coming up with it, yet it is very refined and nicely put together. In a way, I'm not really surprised that no one has done this before. I mean, it's just common place that if you want a trem you buy a guitar equipped with one; if you want a fixed bridge, you buy that kind of guitar. Expecting to have both is blasphemy.

Now that I got the cheesy part out of the way, I'll get down to business.

I really wanted to try the "standard" version of the Tremol-No for my lone floating bridge guitar. I was once a big fan of the Floyd Rose variations, but as time went on I started playing far more chords than whammy dives, and my whammy equipped guitars started to sit. I slowly sold most of them aside from one of the prizes of my collection, the Ibanez JEM2KDNA. Mine being one of 300 made, containing a mans blood in the paint, I couldn't part with it. I don't play it much either, sadly. It's kind of embarrassing being I'm hardly a collector but I own a guitar that retailed at $5,000 that does nothing more than look pretty. I just can't get much use out of the trem. Strumming chords with a hard picking attack causes some strange overtones as strings go slightly out of tune. Doing bends of course makes life miserable for tuning as well. Don't even think about alternate tunings without spending a few hours trying to set the guitar back up. So I'm left with a guitar that would play really nice, if only it weren't for the cumbersome bridge. Don't get me wrong, I still like to play with the trem now and then, but for maybe 95% of my playing, it gets in the way. That's where I'm hoping Kevan comes in...

Installation:
I received my Tremol-No and ripped the packaging open to find essentially 3 pieces. A new tremolo claw with a pole of sorts attached, a new "retainer" piece for the underside of the bridge with a shaft for the pole to be inserted to, and a pair of thumb screws. I figured I wouldn't even need the instructions and immediately tore apart my guitar. Installation took me about 15 minutes the first try including disassembly and tuning. Boy was I disappointed. This thing stunk. My trem felt like it was swimming in molasses and the guitar went out of tune every time I touched the bridge. So I called Kevan up and asked what was wrong. He went through and explained everything to me real nicely and I went and looked at the instructions afterwards to find out just how stupid I was. So I followed the instructions and did things over from scratch. My only mistake was I did not align things properly and that pole was causing friction inside the shaft. So doing things properly didn't take any extra time in the end. Still was a 15 minute job. There may be fine tuning needed for some, but by just sighting things up I was able to get good results.

Initial Impression:
After installing properly I first played around with my guitar with the trem "unlocked." I really couldn't tell anything had changed. I still had the same amount of flutter, I could still pull up just as far and dives took no more effort. I could still easily modulate pitch changes with the trem. If there is any kind of difference in tone or playability, it is so subtle that I could not notice. I'm usually famous for going out of my way to find things to complain about too, so I thought this would be the place where this device would fail. So far so good.

I then locked the thing up. Without using much force (think hand tightening a bolt on your car) the unit locks down pretty tight. You can still move the trem, but you have to really try to do it. If you picked your guitar up with the bar it would likely go out of tune. This is just what I'd say is an average tightness though, you can tighten further by spending an extra 2 seconds with the screws. I didn't think much of things at first. Chords sounded a little brighter at first, which was pretty obvious... but I just wasn't too excited about things. It was just a feeling of indifference. So I put the guitar down until I could let my feelings settle and come back to give it a better test.

Further Impressions:
The next day I spent much more time playing. Always in the locked position. I did a lot of double stop bends and things along those lines. It was quite nice how I could play open strings or chords and bend a single note without the rest going sour. Something I do fairly often for a neat effect. Then I started strumming hard like I would on a strat. Chords really started to sing out a lot more. It's not night and day, but there is a pretty noticeable improvement in the overall tone. The upper-midrange is a lot more pronounced now, even playing unplugged. Single note runs sound more compressed, a closer sound to the strats that I always play.

The real neat part was when I removed the lock screws from the nut of my guitar. Even more improvement in tone. Sustain moved up to the acceptable range (standard double-locking trem is unacceptable to me). Things got better from there when I went and messed with the tuning. Anything from a simple drop-D to any alternate tuning you want to think of. Just as simple as it would be with a true fixed-bridge. Pretty impressive.

So I'm not going to say that this is the greatest invention since tapped beer, but it is pretty cool. I can't say for sure, but I will probably keep my guitar in the locked position almost all of the time now. I will certainly be playing it more often now that it is more usable to me. If I build/buy another floating bridge guitar, I will be installing a Tremol-No. Oh, and though I haven't tried it yet, I am pretty certain this will make string changes far easier and it should be a much more effective method of stabilizing the bridge than my trusty "dirty-sock-ol-no."
 

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Ehhhh...

Maybe if it were engineered a little better.

If you can still move the bar at all, it's not really doing it's job is it?

And if you have to leave the control cover off or cut a big gaping hole in the existing one...

I dunno.

Still seems like a solution for a nonexistant problem. My trem guitars I want the trem, my no-trem guitars, well.. you get it. ;)

Good review though, Jay. Very well-written and informative.
 

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Actually, the bridge isn't moving [or shouldn't be] but there's ALWAYS play between the bar and the holder so that's most likely the movement he's referring to ;)
 

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The movement was exactly as I stated. It was because I just didn't tighten it down enough. It can be further tightened, but with a super quick motion it is tight enough to be fully effective.

I always have my back covers removed... just because I tear stuff apart so often. Works for me I guess.
 

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I never have my cover off as the trem springs ring and it annoys the hell out of me. I stuff some cotton between the springs and put the cover back on.

I think you are right about the string-changing though, it could be really good for that.
 

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plus he stated that you really have to get in there and make sure you want it to move. So it sounds like it's blocking it up pretty good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #96 ·
I nabbed this from Project Guitar.com as Kevan was talking about the latest news on the Tremol-no
(main reason I'm posting is because I get bragging rights to the name (for better or worse)) ;) So the latest development in the saga is as follows:

When I started this whole thing I wasn't sure if folks were into turning their floaters into 'dive only', so I just stuck with the simple "on or off" concept. There is, however, an accessory for the Tremol-No that *does* allow you to turn your full-floater into a dive-only trem. The licensees haven't been too keen on it, but I keep seeing more and more posts around the 'net asking for that ability. someone brought it up again recently, and so......
The accessory is called the Deep-C. It works with the Tremol-No and allows the trem to be set up as 'dive only'. This adjustment can also be done in 2 seconds, just like the main locking/unlocking of the Tremol-No itself. It's an option, so you can put it on or take it off whenever you want, still with no modification to the guitar or the Tremol-No unit.

Thought this was a kewl idea since there are times I'm in a dropped tuning and would still like to dive bomb, this makes that possible.

One more trick to add to the arsenal.

Bamm
 

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Sweet. Whether or not you need one of these babies is a totally subjective thing, and will be determined by YOUR needs... but I personally know that I'd kill to be able to mess around with alternate tunings on my 7620 without having to spend 20 minutes fine-tuning, and that for the majority of the "bluesy" gigs I've played (yep, i played with a blues/rock group for a while that really dug the fact I'd be jamming out on a pointy-headstock 7-string. i REALLY miss those guys, lol), this thing would have been a godsend for my compound bends.

-D
 

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That sounds awesome. My "floater" (I hear Austin Powers as I write that) is set to dive only. But to have a nice device that would allow both... wowsers! How could one go about getting said nifty device? Anyone know?
 

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No clue. Offering Kevan my Britany Spears-lookalike sister as the official Tremol-no model hasn't gotten me anywhere yet, lol, and if THAT won't cut it...

-D
 

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Rich said:
The idea that you could use this to lock the bridge after breaking a string during a performance is weak, you'd be locking it out of tune, better just to stop and grab the backup of course ;)
I know this is from way back. But also, even if you could get it to stay in tune---You're MISSING a string! Grab the backup.
 
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