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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to start painting guitars. I have heard that
gravity feed spray guns are the best.Is this true??
I don't want anything fancy,just a good quality spray gun.
What's good for the money??
Let me know your thoughts.
Thanks
 

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You might want to read the ReRanch 101 tutorial (basic guitar refinishing) on the ReRanch site (www.reranch.com I think). It's a very useful site, and they make some specific recommendations on different types of spray guns and their relative merits.
Bert
 

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if you're going more the industrial route for "production" you'll wanna check out a devilbiss... try to find one of the older NON HVLP ones, they atomize the paint better. may be hard to find depending on your state. california has banned the use of the old school paint guns from my understanding, atleast for automotive type applications.

Mike
 

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TheToneZone said:
if you're going more the industrial route for "production" you'll wanna check out a devilbiss... try to find one of the older NON HVLP ones, they atomize the paint better. may be hard to find depending on your state. california has banned the use of the old school paint guns from my understanding, atleast for automotive type applications.

Mike
+1 with non-HVLP

I used to sell painting equipment. Larivee was one of my customers, they use DeVilbiss. But don't let the guys at the local AutoParts Store sell you a DeVilbiss GTi, they are designed for automotive paints, if you want to spray laquer, you will have all kinds of build-up problems. Stick to the Tried and True JGA-510 Series. For laquer, use an FF tip with a 704 Air Cap, or the same tip with a 765 Cap if you're doing Metallics.

Keep in mind that for any Air Spray (non HVLP) you will need at minimum a True 5 HP compressor with an 80 gallon tank to do any kind of production. A JGA-510 consumes about 17 to 19 CFM (Cubic Feet Per minute, of Air) depending on the air cap.

Hope this helps!
 

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glockhead said:
Good info Pinto. How do laquer paints spray in comparison to any of the other paints available?
I have limited experience painting myself, but having been in the idustry, I learned a few things.

Laquer is probably the most forgiving finish, because you spray it light and if something gets in it (eg. dust) you can sand the area lightly and spray again. It also buffs fairly easy. Some epoxy (two part) paints, once you spray it, that's it, it won't stick to itself so you have to strip and start over. Polyester paints can explode/react violently if mixed wrong.

Automotive Enamel is reasonably forgiving and readily available. I'm actually going to use Krylon to paint my Strat for a tour... Flat white!

Hope you can use the info!
 
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