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sniperfrommars1 said:
look at the closeup those are rosewood ;). esp and jackson unlike most ibanezes typically have finish on the fretboards giving that glossy ebony look.
I have never in my life seen a Jackson or an ESP that had a finish on an ebony or rosewood board.
 

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Have to agree there Darren,not once have i seen a Jackson with any kind of "finish" on the fretboard,althou i have heard of other makes that stain fretboard in particular Rosewood to make it appear darker,But anyone with 2 mins spare who wants a shiney board can polish it up for the shiney look.

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
By finish I mean the laquer clearcoat or whatever they put on the back of the necks. Its the same on all my buddies kh-2's darren :)
 

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I know what you meant. And i stand by my assertion that Jackson and ESP don't make a habit of putting clearcoat on rosewood or ebony boards because: 1) There's no need; and 2) it tends to chip and wear as strings are dragged across it.

The only exceptions would be custom shop jobs that have their fretboards painted with a graphic job or colour-matched to the body/headstock.

I've never seen a KH-2 in person, but i can't imagine why they would clearcoat the rosewood board. Are you sure it's not just buffed to a shine?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
It chips like the finish on a maple neck strats fretboard does. The other jackson Ive seen finish on are a ghetto performer series dinky, and a USA kelly. Its not buffed its the same stuff as on the back of the neck although not very thick ;). Albeit i havent seen it on all guitars, If I had a digital cam I would show you ;).
 

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I must voice this,I have owned,in the past,5 USA jacksons,12 ish Japanese Jacksons and countless Charvels from early eighties,Not once have i come across a Clear coated fretboard,i have asked my bud and he's not heard of it either,he's asking a bloke he knows that used to work for them :)
Sniper,i'm not dissagreeing with ya,but are you sure it's Clear coat and not a high degree of buffing,ebony boards shiney really REALLY well with a buffer...Trust me i know :) I had the shineiest fretboard ever seen lol

Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Once again Ive seen it chip darnit. :)> Its not a buffing damnit. lol. I can tell the difference between clear coat and a buffed fretboard.
 

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sniperfrommars1 said:
Once again Ive seen it chip darnit.
... which is exactly why dark fretboards are almost never clearcoated.

If those guitars you've seen had clearcoat on the entire fretboard face, i highly doubt it was done at the factory. It makes fret installation and dressing a lot more complicated, which costs money. It's also unneccessary to protect rosewood or ebony in that way, and because they're dark, relatively oily woods, any finish would be more susceptible to chipping or flaking, which would be extremely obvious because of the dark colour.

If you say you've seen it, then fine. But don't say it's "typical" for any guitar manufacture to clearcoat rosewood or ebony fretboards, because it's not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Touche darren :(. But these are factory import jackson and charvles, but the one odd usa. Why does fender do this to maple as well if it makes it so hard? I know it keeps it cleaner better, but I like that worn in look anyways.
 

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Well, maple is a different story. I really needs some sort of protection or it looks messy really quickly. It's also not an oily wood, so it probably holds the finish a bit better.

Finishing a fretboard takes a lot of care. If you do it before the frets are installed, you have to be extremely careful to not chip the finish when the fret slots are cut (or re-cut after the clear fills them in a bit) or when the frets are hammered in.

If you spray on the clear after the frets are in, you either have to carefully mask off all the frets (unlikely) or go back and carefully score and scrape the clear off the frets.

Either way, import or not, there's a lot of handwork involved for what is largely a pointless exercise for rosewood or ebony.

Leaving the board unfinished is preferable, because all you have to do is mask it off, shoot your clearcoat and it's done, whether the frets are already in or not.
 

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Hmm... you know, i'm gonna have to go with Sniper on this one...
Alright, i've never personally seen a Ibanez, Jackson, or ESP with a cleared rosewood/ebony fretboard. I'm not saying they don't exist, hell, we all know how many one-off freaks leak out of Ibanez.
Anyway, the rosewood fretboards on both of my Dillion 7's are gloosy-looking, and have virtually NO pores to them. It's really hard to find rosewood that doesn't have some pores showing. Also, one of the boards has a small indentation of the low-B's string winding in it. Also, for more proof, i put some lemon oil on it, and all that it did was clean the board. It didn't change the colour of the wood at all, it's like it didn't absorb like it normally does on a rosewood board. All other rosewood-board guitars that i've oiled up had at least a little bit of change in colour, but not these!
Just thought i'd add my thoughts :)
```Ben```
 

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Just a thought, but, here's what I do. I use a wood conditioner on alot of fretboards, it is a paste that basically does what lemon oil does, it conditions the wood giving it a long long life, it also seals the pores a bit, and conceals any minor scratches. However, if you apply it wrong (ie, don't wipe it off in between it's cure time and hardening time) it could possibly chip I suppose, although, to miss that time, you really have to miss it, you have a good 48 hours to wipe it.
I can't imagine clear on a rosewood or ebony board. If it is ebony, I have seen highly polished ebony, and the surface of it can chip as well, and almost appear like a paint chip, this is because ebony, ironically is a fairly brittle wood, it doesn't act like any other wood, if you plane it, or sand it, it's almost liek a chalk, it doesn't cut like rosewood or maple. It's also very messy, when it gets to dry, it can flake, crack, or chip, is it possible you're looking at ebony boards that are chipping? for what it's worth, I have seen some crappy ebony that is very very light looking almost like dark rosewood, I did an inlay on a custom neck with a piece of ebony that I didn't believe was ebony until I started working with it, it was grainy, and not black like ebony normally is.

Possibility?
 

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Personally I've never seen, or myself, finished a Rosewood or Ebony board with anything other than an oil.

Maple boards are finished with a lacquer purely because they will dirt up too quickly, they don't need the lacquer to fill the grain/pores anyway as Maple has a tight grain, it is purely cosmetic.

To lacquer an Ebony board is pointless to be honest, I very much doubt the lacquer would be able to penetrate it significantly and it would just sit on top like peanut butter, I guess the only lacquered Ebony you'll find will be guitar bodies.
Rosewood can be lacquered, but again, there is no point, the pores are reasonably tight and finishing with an oil gives it a nice feel plus it conditions the wood.

All wood requires different approaches, which is what I find interesting about making guitars, it's a great hobby/business to be involved in, not only does it get you thinking and experimenting, but it also gets you involved in the environment.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
It was a rosewood lowend model jackson that I first saw it on. Really light color of grain which also doesnt absorb lemon oil Ijust thought of that. It could be possible that its not a typical clearcoat that much is true, but it does chip so it may be some other type of finish but it does cover the entire neck *with the exception of frets*
 
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