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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tuck all the tails into the knot/loop of the adjacent strings. That way if the string slips at the bridge, it cant go very far. It’s a lot less chance of getting a ding in the top of the guitar.

There is a couple of local luthiers that will change CG strings for 30 and 40 dollars, plus the cost of strings, or bring your own strings. I learned from one of the guys at the mom and pop shop years ago. But he never tucks the g string. He just cuts that one off. Does this seem like a rip off to anyone here?

I figured out how to tie at the peg, so the string will never slip. I thought I was pretty slick, until a really good lady luthier show a video of her doing it the same way. Great minds think alike? Well, I don’t know(y)

Do any of you have a different method? I like mine neat and tidy, without large lengths of string touching the top. If you have a neat looking way of doing it, please post a pic.
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Lol, that's what I tried last time I restrung my classical... don't know if the strings were too old or what, but the G, B, and E, broke pretty quickly. I for sure tucked the ends into the adjacent strings, but I twisted the string over the bridge before that. I think I'm due to take my classical in to a professional.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
On mine, right now, I have the same set of strings on as I had two summers ago. Savarez NT Cantiga basses, and Daniel Mari 100P trebles. The Cantiga basses are one favorite, as are Pyramid Double Silver. I still have around 70 sets of Classical Strings. I gave away 30 or so sets that I tried that I wasn’t going to use again to some friends on another forum.

I don’t play the classical too much these days. So my 70 plus sets of strings will Last a long time.
 

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Yeah, as mentioned elsewhere I tried to pick back up the guitar after a LONG hiatus. Step 1 was restringing the guitars that had old strings, including the classical guitar. Didn't even get the B up to pitch and it popped. I must be doing something wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I hate tying Titanium Trebles. They are so slick and slip so easily. I actually rough up the tie ends with sand paper, and use an extra loop. What kind of trebles do you use?
 

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That's one way of doing it, and some makers recommend this tuck method.

I just do two loops for all of them (not necessary for bass, I know) except high E and B (they get three) at the bridge. At the headstock, about 3-4 wraps is plenty for all the strings; the holes in the rollers on my guitar are big enough so I can loop the string through them twice, so no need for underwrapping while tuning up so the string locks under itself (another method some use).

EJ45s for me, unpretentious strings which have decent life too, imo. I used to mix and match treble and bass sets fro different brands, but I'm not in that world anymore, as it were, so it's just costly, and I got sick of trying to find a G that wasn't tubby sounding. Savarez wound treble was the best but finger squeaks drove me spare, so I went back to regular. For another way to get over this issue, I've seen people recommend appropriate gauge fishing line of particular composites; haven't tried it though.

Strings for a classical is like pickups or pedals for an electric. Some guitars sound better with brand X, others with brand Y, and personal preference plays a role too. Can be interesting trying out different ones for sure.
 
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