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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Inspired by repairing my dodgy wah pedal (faulty connection between the inductor and a lug on the input), i've decided I'd like to make a new channel switching pedal for my amp, a trusty old Crate GT200 four channel hybrid head. Does anyone know of any websites that might give me a basic grounding in electronics to do this? The box will consist of the following:

2 switches hooked up to a stereo output:
1 switch will toggle between clean and distorted. The other will switch between solid state and tube. (that's how my current pedal works so it's pretty easy to just take out those switches and put them in a new box).
The next part is to add a few LEDs: a green one for clean channel, a red one for distortion, and maybe an amber one to indicate that the tube has been switched into the circut, and blue for when it's not.

Any advice on how to go about this? Do I just wire an LED and resistor in series between the switch and the corresponding wire to the output, or is there more to it than that? Do I need to power the LEDs or will there be enough power from the amp to do this?

I'm confident enough to do general maintenance work on my pedals (replacing broken battery clips, soldering loose connections etc) but this will be my first foray into what I hope becomes a nice little hobby. :)
 

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There isn't any power in the pedal unless you have a 9V battery or DC input connection as a power source. You can't power anything off of the guitar signal. You will need to provide a voltage supply for the LEDs (lets say 9V), and a matching resistor (say 330 or 470 ohms for a 9V source for a bright LED) in series with the LED. (Make sure you get the direction right on the LEDs ... the flat at the base of the LED goes to the ground side.) You will need to switch them seperately from the guitar signal, such as from another pole of a double-pole switch. You don't need all of those LEDs to indicate the things you mentioned, but you can certainly use them if you like the look. You might want to use bi-color or multi-color LEDs to make it a little nicer. In a bi-color, you get red and green in one LED which can be turned on individually for either red or green, or both together to get amber. A multi-color LED has red, green, and blue chips in it and can produce practically any color of the rainbow by changing the voltages on its pins (can give very cool effects). Find some books at your local bookstore to get you started. Good luck.
 

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