Ibanez JEM Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,647 Posts
yep people say they work. I havn't tried them out myself though. I use steel wool and tape off the fret board. You can also take a metal polishing compound and use a dremel tool with a small buffer on it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,354 Posts
You may also want to look at microfiber sanding pads or paper.
I see it in 1500 grit all the way to 12,000 grit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
47 Posts
I have found the fret erasers to be a bit of work. For simple polishing, microfiber abrasives or polishing wheels are still my preference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
479 Posts
I have found the fret erasers to be a bit of work. For simple polishing, microfiber abrasives or polishing wheels are still my preference.
that's good info I was thinking of getting the erasers, but have heard good info about the microfiber abrasives. Do you mean microfiber (like cloths) or the micromesh (that are on a sponge).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,791 Posts
12,000!?!?!

I think regular copier paper is 6000 :wink:
Micro Mesh 12000 is basically equivalent to something like 4000 grit regular paper. The scale they use is not the same.

I used their "1500" on a guitar and scratched the hell out of the finish. Turns out that it's equivalent to 400 grit. After that debacle, I never touch a guitar finish with anything coarser than their "4000" grit, which is basically 1500 and usually I just stick to the 6000, 8000 and 12000 grades.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
Ive used the fret erasers. But I still like the oooo steel wool way better.

I think the fret erasers are great for getting any nicks out, but the leave a dull finish that doesnt cut for me. Then I'm doing more work than i would have my old way to get the smooth feeling and shine.

And yea, I've found that chrome bumper polish will prolong the shine on your frets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
I've recently used fret erasers for the first time. They work okay, but going straight from the crowning file to the course eraser then moving up is a lot of work and didn't give me results I would be happy handing over to a customer. I have a strat to do here soon, I'll try to incorporate steel wool and maybe some micro mesh into the process.

The fret erasers are okay, if I'm just touching up my own... Great. If someone is going to really scrutinize my work, I need more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
The Micro mesh pads are the way to go. I use 320 sterated paper on the frets after crowning and then 400 and up Micromesh pads. The frets not only look better, but they feel better too. It feels like your guitar is fretted with permanantly lubricated glass rods.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,116 Posts
I thought I'd add something to this thread.

I bought a set of (5) erasers from Stewmac. http://www.stewmac.com/shop/Frettin...s.html?read=reviews&reviewsort=newest#reviews They do work as advertised, but the 1000 grit (final size) eraser is still not fine enough to call the fret polished. As stated above........micro-mesh is need for the final finish.

Here are some pics I took doing one fret. This is on a neck that has some slight scarf joint shrinkage and is therefore already in need of a re-fret, I'm just using it to practice my skills.

The set comes in 5 different grits (#180, #400,#600, #800, #1000) I have included pics at each stage including fret filing.

The set:


16th fret after filing:


#180 grit:


#400 grit:


#600 grit:


#800 grit:


#1000 grit:


You can see in the last pic that I still have a small amount of file markings on the fret, which means I have to start over.......... oh well, more practice.

In all, I think these erasers are nice tools, but there are a few downfalls. Most importantly the set needs two more grits included- a #300, and a #1500. Adding those two sizes should eliminate the need for micro-mesh.

The other problem I have is that, like all erasers, these have small bits come off as you use them. It doesn't take long to wear down the sharp edges leaving you a rounded off corner. I don't see them lasting a very long time (5 or 6 fret-jobs maybe?) but they should be great for someone that likes to do their own guitar work as I do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,298 Posts
The final picture doesn't look too bad. That would be suitable to play ok still wouldn't it?

That's a nice looking brass block you have there Ryc! :lol: ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,116 Posts
The final picture doesn't look too bad. That would be suitable to play ok still wouldn't it?

That's a nice looking brass block you have there Ryc! :lol: ;)
LOL.... the block is a little shinier now:p

Yeah, they're definitely playable, but nowhere near as nice as you'd expect if you were paying for a fret polish. It's not even close to a factory new fret.

Here's another pic of the 16th and 17th........ you can see how much better the 16th is than where it started from, but not worth the $35 the erasers cost.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,298 Posts
Sounds like the erasers are definitely a amateur diy product at most then. Stew Mac are really hit and miss with their products aren't they? Either really useful and good quality, or just average to crap.

Nice and shiny block then. :)
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top