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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I became interested in metal a few years ago and since then I bought a guitar which I haven't made much progress with. All I have been doing is trying to learn riffs by ear, mostly by slowing songs down or listening to the same sections over and over. I haven't been able to learn an entire song by ear so I know I am doing something wrong. I know the names of some chords and I could read tab, but I've heard of people figuring out a song by hearing what key it's in etc. I am aware that learning music theory could help but I just don't know where to begin. I saw this video on YouTube, and it talks a bit about music theory and some books which can help, has anyone tried this out? How were the results?


I've read of chords, scales, modes but I don't seem to understand it since the information is all over the place, from different websites, some seem to explain things differently so I don't know what is correct. I cannot afford guitar lessons at the moment, but if I could just get some sense of direction that would be just great, thank you.
 

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Learning music theory will speed your progress, especially in conjunction with developing your aural skills. This will help you identify notes by ear and help you determine the key of a song, chord progression or solo. You don't necessarily have to learn how to sight-read notation and as you progress tabs will become less important as far as learning songs. Also, learning basic guitar setup, as is available on this site, will help immensely.

I recommend lessons, at least for short period. A good instructor can help you with technique, help you prevent injury, and tailor a specific study structure to help you achieve your goals. If you truly have the will to play guitar, you can find a way to earn money for a few lessons. While it is quite possible to learn without lessons(many people do it), you will accelerate the process with a few months of professional instruction.

Until then:
Learn notes of the fretboard
Intervals-helps you understand note relationship
Triads-helps you learn chord construction
Scales-helps you with chord progressions, soloing, determining key, etc.
Aural Skills-Helps you identify pitch by ear, excellent for improvising and learning songs by ear
Use a metronome

Even if you have a few hours to practice, take periodic breaks and NEVER play if you experience pain in your hand or wrist. I have learned first-hand how serious tendon and ligament injuries can be.
 

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www.guitarjamz.com .............................!!!!!!!!

This is a website by a guy called Marty Swartz. He is brilliant at teaching guitar.

He is a blues player so for me as my two main interests are blues and metal it was a good place to start. Even if you are not into blues I would recommend it. he teaches the basics (and really advanced) so well. different styles will make you a better player anyway.

He really starts at the absolute basics and work from there - name of each string, open chords, scales, intervals (he explains these in a great way), bar chords, strumming patterns, etc etc etc.

This may sound like something a basic but with strumming he starts you on one down stroke on each beat, then adding an up strock inbetween and then adding in various patterns as you progress. It really really works and develops the basic building blocks before moving on.

He teaches chords so you start with the easiest and move on, also so the chords you have just sussed help to get the fingering right for the next ones you will learn.

There are lots of different sections to work through so you can work on chords one day, strumming next, scales, picking etc etc.

I cannot recommend it enough. I started this a few weeks back and love it. You can sign up for a 3 day trial and then sign up if you want. If you don't like it, you can get your money back no questions asked.

I have also bought membership for Lick Library (the metal side). this is full of soo much stuff it's amazing. Not just metal either. www.licklibrary.com

I use LL for all things like alternate picking, riffs, licks etc. There is a lot on this site!

I combine my time between the two sites and this seems to work well.

One thing worth doing as someone on here said is getting a metronome. Learn to play a scale, lick etc, then practice what you have just learnt with the metronome. This really really helps perfect what you are learning and play in time.

In case you don't do it. Learn to tap your foot as you play, this really helps perfect timing also. This is where the basic one strum on each beat is good place for this, then the upstrum comes on the top of the foot movement.
 

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You can just continue as you are and eventually be where I'm at now. 20 years in, can play almost anything you hear but when the other guys in the band start talking about music stuff, you'll be left out of the conversation since the words coming out of their mouths are mumbo-jumbo. They'll be amazed by your ears but overall not impressed by your skills. Some people can take direction from text or videos while the rest of us suddenly become dyslexic, do yourself a favor and try to get any bit of person to person instruction you can find or manage to afford. And play a lot! Put the guitar down when you get frustrated or tense, come back to it with clarity. ;)
 

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I became interested in metal a few years ago and since then I bought a guitar which I haven't made much progress with. All I have been doing is trying to learn riffs by ear, mostly by slowing songs down or listening to the same sections over and over. I haven't been able to learn an entire song by ear so I know I am doing something wrong. I know the names of some chords and I could read tab, but I've heard of people figuring out a song by hearing what key it's in etc. I am aware that learning music theory could help but I just don't know where to begin. I saw this video on YouTube, and it talks a bit about music theory and some books which can help, has anyone tried this out? How were the results?


I've read of chords, scales, modes but I don't seem to understand it since the information is all over the place, from different websites, some seem to explain things differently so I don't know what is correct. I cannot afford guitar lessons at the moment, but if I could just get some sense of direction that would be just great, thank you.
seems to me you should go to a local open mic night meet some other musos ,,do some jammin ,I say this because you are learning rock songs and there are alot of rock songs that dont sound complete with out the rest of the band ,you know the other instruments ,.meeting a few other musos will help you learn ,.
get yourself out there dude ,dont worry to much about theory thats more confusing than music its self ,
Cheers T
 

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The problem with teaching yourself anything is that you always question "Am I on the right path?" There is such a glut of information out there that it is easy to get lost in it all, a teacher would send you down one path towards your goals. Then you can then use the web information to bolster what technique you may be working on at that time.

Learning chords and their relationship to scales (theory) helps immensely in understanding song structure.

When you start writing your own material, knowing theory is imperative.

Good luck!!
 

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Well first you'll need to purchase 2 new Jem EVO replicas, an Axe FX rack unit, a Mesa full stack - prob Mark V or Road King II - a full PA system, at least 3000w worth (dual power amps, Mackie mixer, EQ, effects, tube mic preamp, power conditioner, BBE, etc), all the proper cabling to patch everything together - keep it high end though so you don't have signal loss; maybe Monster Proline or something similar, a new computer and new ProTools HD setup...

And if buying all that doesn't help then you should prob just find a good teacher. And play any guitar you can get your hands on. ;)
 

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Well first you'll need to purchase 2 new Jem EVO replicas, an Axe FX rack unit, a Mesa full stack - prob Mark V or Road King II - a full PA system, at least 3000w worth (dual power amps, Mackie mixer, EQ, effects, tube mic preamp, power conditioner, BBE, etc), all the proper cabling to patch everything together - keep it high end though so you don't have signal loss; maybe Monster Proline or something similar, a new computer and new ProTools HD setup...

And if buying all that doesn't help then you should prob just find a good teacher. And play any guitar you can get your hands on. ;)
Oh god... monster cables... they're only good for their warranty. and maybe as a weapon.
 

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Don't forget getting your personal private jet. I mean, how are you going to get to garage band rehearsals with all your gear?
 

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Don't forget getting your personal private jet. I mean, how are you going to get to garage band rehearsals with all your gear?
It's comments like this that are misleading to other members, and only serve to perpetuate internet falsities which eventually become 'the rule'. A Prevost XLII is more than sufficient for the first year of learning.
 

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It's comments like this that are misleading to other members, and only serve to perpetuate internet falsities which eventually become 'the rule'. A Prevost XLII is more than sufficient for the first year of learning.
A valid point... Although if you really wanna be a pro player, you should prob have both. And don't forget making sure to hire a top notch crew to move, carry, setup, tear down, dial in, tweak, adjust, and modify all of your newly acquired gear. THEN you'll really sound good. The more people on your crew the better you will sound.

The belief that you need to "know how to play", or need to "know music" has been perpetuated by elitist artists who only want to keep down the masses so as to elevate their own social status. Just because they spent years and years learning and practicing doesn't mean the up-and-coming "artists" of today need to bother with such trivialities! Just buy your way to good playing!
 

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Plus, how are we going to come up with new styles if people keep teaching each other stuff? It's counterproductive. That's why I removed the dots from my fretboard, I'M THE BOSS OF ME!
 

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In my opinion it's always best to start in the following way

1) Learn a few basic chords and chord progressions. e.g. C, D, E, A, G
2) Learn how to strum these chords in a nice progression
3) Learn a simple song using tabs... e.g. Oasis - Wonderwall [I think the first song I ever learnt]
4) Learn a few more "easy" songs
5) start building up technical ability with a metronome, learning a scale and playing it to the beat of a metronome over and over

You will quickly get bored unless you learn a song end-to-end I think... since you're into metal it will be difficult to find a decent song to learn at the start as they will be tougher than other genres.

Some decent metal songs I learnt to start with, that weren't too technical:
Papa roach - last resort
system of a down - sugar
 

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^ Early Sabbath has to be the easiest metal to learn from beginning to end. Iommi was my first teacher, lol. The best part is, anyone who doesn't play thinks you're amazing when you play Iron Man. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Sorry for the huge delay, work and school take up most of my time so I had almost forgotten about this thread.

I will go ahead and take everyone's advice in that I need someone to teach me guitar, I spent a lot of time trying to figure out all the theory on my own but I didn't know how to apply it to my playing.

Thanks for all the feedback, the funny stuff too hahaha.
 

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I always felt the most guitar teachers milked their students time. Meaning they would teach a bunch of useless crap to string lessons on longer (*this is from someone who has professionally taught guitar).

People learn in different ways.....some NEED teachers to show them what to do, others can learn from just playing (after learning some basic fundamentals IE correct hand positioning) and others learn best from tab.

Me....

A very long time ago I was given the Ozzy Osborne Tribute to RR complete TAB book. 100% novice but had a 5 min. explanation of TAB.
By shear desire and force of will I learned most every song in the album note for note (*with the exception of 2 songs)

After that experience it gave me the muscle control and dexterity to play just about anything, and learned theory, scales and other along the way.

Funny thing is that I still play quite a few of those old tunes!

Again...

What works for you and others may be different. The most important thing is to start with a guitar that is properly set up. I can not count the times a young student would come to me and their parents gave them a guitar that was unplayable....and I was expected to teach them on a guitar I couldnt play!

---also.....have fun, never make it work.

~JH
 
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