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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello gentlemen.

I have a fixed bridge question. I've said it before, and I know that it's pretty hard to believe, but I've never owned a fixed bridge before. I've had two vintage trems and between 7 and 10 fully floating trems. As well as had many others in my posession while doing setups for clients and such.

Now, on all of my locking trems, I block the bridge to make it a fixed bridge with a locking nut and fine tuners. I don't actually USE trems. I just love the stability and the tone. And I also enjoy setting them up.

Problem is, I, for some odd reason, only like setting up OTHER people's bridges. Mine are just as easy, if not, easier to set up. I just enjoy doing other people's guitars more.

So I want my first fixed bridge. I know that upgrading the nut, tuners and saddles will help the stability, but will it ever be as stable as my blocked floating trems?

hanks guys!
-Damien
 

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The fixed bridge would be every bit as stable, provided the nut, tuners, and bridge are kosher, as your blocked trems. The only advantage I see with your blocked trem is fine tuning. One way around that would be the fixed Edge bridge.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I love the fixed Edge. I plan on putting one on my custom build.

And I'm cool without fine tuners and all that.

I think the nut is why I want a fixed bridge. A normal nut is just so much more comfortable than a locking.

Do you (or anyone else) have any experience with a Tusq nut? I know that they're good for intonation and all, but how do they affect tuning stability? Nice and low-friction? Because that's what put me off fixed bridges. When you make even the smallest bend and you go out of tune because of the "sticky" nut that fu*k's with the equalibrium between the playable string and what's behind the nut.

And how are they tonally? Being a Death Metal, I like a darker tone. But the nut material probably doesn't change your tone THAT much.
 

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I love the Tusq nuts. Got them on most of my non-locking guitars. They self lubricate as they're impregnated with teflon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I love the Tusq nuts. Got them on most of my non-locking guitars. They self lubricate as they're impregnated with teflon.
Really? That sounds great! I'm definitely sold on the stability of it then.

How does it compare to a normal Graphite? Because, while tone and stability are the most important, I'd still much rather have a black nut.

Oh, and just so you guys know, this is for no guitar specifically. I still don't own a fixed bridge. I'm just getting a pile of info for future purposes!
 

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I think that there is some extra tuning stability in the floyd,
because variations in string tension in one string will be absorbed by the springs and spread to the other strings.

I suggest an experiment,
get the guitar in tune, turn one of the machine heads through 180 degrees,
check the tuning of all the strings and take note.
Return the guitar to tune, block or lock the floyd,
turn the machine head 180 degrees as before and note the tuning.
As it is hard to be exact in turning the machine head I suggest doing it twice on each string and averaging the results to cancel out errors.

I would expect the guitar to go less out of tune on one string with the floyd,
and also there would be a compensating effect relative to the other strings,
so it would sound less out of tune.

Maybe an interesting science project for someone at school or uni.
 
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