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Discussion Starter #1
I know the rough basics of it...right turn = less bow and left turn =more bow etc etc but why should turning a nut bend a truss rod??? Can anyone explain this in layman's terms?
 

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The truss rod is in the neck already bent. As you tighten the nut the rod is pulled and this straitens the rod. As the rod straightens it bends the neck backwards to correct for the string tension. If you loosen the nut the rod can bend and the strings can pull the neck into a bow.
Jim
 

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I'm curious about this as well. I've looked around on the internet but I couldn't really find the answer. Courtney probably knows.. Or Jaden... It's probably very technical.
 

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The truss rod is in the neck already bent. As you tighten the nut the rod is pulled and this straitens the rod. As the rod straightens it bends the neck backwards to correct for the string tension. If you loosen the nut the rod can bend and the strings can pull the neck into a bow.
Jim
ya dont really need to look much further. looks like Vim covered it. unless you just want the fine details of it....

this might help too....
http://fretmd.com/how-a-truss-rod-works/
 

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turn a double acting rod clockwise


and anticlockwise.


some rods (like ibanez) are only single acting, i use the double acting type.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
ya dont really need to look much further. looks like Vim covered it. unless you just want the fine details of it....

this might help too....
http://fretmd.com/how-a-truss-rod-works/
Thanks for posting...so "by tightening the truss rod you increase the neck's resistance to the tension exerted by the strings".

I get that. But I still don't get how turning the nut of the truss rod you can make the neck's resistance greater??? I don't get the mechanics of it LOL! :confused:

As you tighten the nut the rod is pulled and this straitens the rod. As the rod straightens it bends the neck backwards to correct for the string tension.
I guess I want to know is HOW the rod is 'pulled' by tightening the nut or HOW the rod is straightened by the turning of the nut...?:D
 

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I guess I want to know is HOW the rod is 'pulled' by tightening the nut or HOW the rod is straightened by the turning of the nut...?:D
See the pics Jaden posted? The blue rod has threaded ends, but the other one doesnt. When you turn the nut, the blue rod is shortened/lengthened as the threads go into the blocks on each end. If its shorter than the other rod, it pulls the other rod in at the ends. If its longer than the other rod, it pushes on the other rod and bends itself.
So if it was in the neck, it would push/pull on the neck, adding or reducing neck relief.
 

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Just think about it. It's like having a stick or something that you hold against the ground. When you push down on it, it bows out somewhere (assuming it doesn't snap).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
See the pics Jaden posted?
Yes, but he says that this is different for the Ibanez rods :confused:

some rods (like ibanez) are only single acting, i use the double acting type.
Jaden, any further clarification, please?

It's like having a stick or something that you hold against the ground. When you push down on it, it bows out somewhere (assuming it doesn't snap).
I totally get that...it's the pushing action which i don't get. This explanation make sense to me with Jaden's pics but is Jaden's truss rod very different to the one I've got in my strat or RG?
 

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I think I understand your question. the truss rod is mounted in a curved groove in the guitar neck (further from the fingerboard in the middle than the ends). When you tighten the nut on the end of the rod, the nut is pushed on the wood around the truss rod pulling the rod tight (the other end of the rod is fixed in the wood but the rest is loose in the groove). It's like the truss rod is in a sleeve of wood and tightening/loosening the nut pulls/slackens the rod within the sleeve. as the rod is pulled tight it straitens in the groove pushing on the thick wood below the fingerboard bending the neck backwards. Loosening allows the neck to be bent forwards by the string tension.
I guess the double acting ones don't need the curved channel (?) as the other part provides this function and of course they don't rely on string tension to bend the neck forwards.
Jim
 

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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think single action rods can only perform the function pictured in the top photo of Jaden's post while a double action rod can perform the functions pictured in both of the photo's in Jaden's post.

I just installed a single action truss rod in a Jackson neck, and it was only capable of the action in Jaden's first photo. Only one end was threaded while the rod just passed through a sleeve at the other end. Double action rods are threaded at both ends.
 

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I think I understand your question. the truss rod is mounted in a curved groove in the guitar neck (further from the fingerboard in the middle than the ends). When you tighten the nut on the end of the rod, the nut is pushed on the wood around the truss rod pulling the rod tight (the other end of the rod is fixed in the wood but the rest is loose in the groove). It's like the truss rod is in a sleeve of wood and tightening/loosening the nut pulls/slackens the rod within the sleeve. as the rod is pulled tight it straitens in the groove pushing on the thick wood below the fingerboard bending the neck backwards. Loosening allows the neck to be bent forwards by the string tension.
I guess the double acting ones don't need the curved channel (?) as the other part provides this function and of course they don't rely on string tension to bend the neck forwards.
Jim
Yeah, double action rods need a straight channel. Thats why most builders prefer them, you can rout the channel by hand easily, you dont need a CNC or a jig to get the right curve because its a flat channel.
 

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I totally get that...it's the pushing action which i don't get. This explanation make sense to me with Jaden's pics but is Jaden's truss rod very different to the one I've got in my strat or RG?
The pushing action is caused by the nut. The tighter it gets, the more force and tension created, which causes it to bow. There's not much more to explain as far as the actual mechanics go, though (unless you're talking about some of the unconventional trusses out there).
 
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