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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought the Ibanez intonation tool. I only needed to intonate the B string cause it was 2 hairs sharp. I had no idea how to do it but figured it out eventually, at least I think I did cause I managed to get the open string and the 12th fret to be exactly on the B.

I didn't know you had to lock that saddle screw after moving the saddle before you can compare, this is a pain in the butt with a double locking

You're supposed to have the locking nut locked, then loosen the saddle screw, adjust the saddle, tighten the saddle screw, unlock the locking nut and tune to pitch and compare

if is not quite there, you have to repeat this process again and again until it gets there. I knew I had to move the saddle towards the bridge, but I had to move it a lot more than I thought, just to get rid of those 2 hairs. I thought all it would take was a quick little turn

Now is perfect and all strings are intonated but now I'm dreading having to do this again lol and in all 6 strings ayyy
 

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Well, clearly the saddle is loose when you loosen the screw, it clearly holds the saddle in place! It's not going to stay where you put it under tension. Welcome to the fun part of setting up a Floyd Rose type bridge. ;)
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That is all pat of the joys of owning a floyd rose guitar. It's really more time consuming than it it difficult.

Fowleri, In the few weeks I've come back to this forum it seems like you dominate the number of topics all dealing with basic setup of your one & only guitar. Most of those discussions have ended up going in circles with you saying you can't find a decent tech or people giving you advice but you not wanting to take it because you either don't understand or are scared to break your guitar. I get not wanting to mess up your baby, but have you ever thought about getting a cheap $50 beater guitar to practice all this stuff on. That way you can take our advice to practice and if you mess something up there's no harm done. After being able to tinker around with a guitar you have no fear of messing up, I guarantee that you'll have learned a lot and a better grasp on things.
 

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Block the tremolo perfectly level.

Tighten the spring claw to make sure it's flush against the block.

Tune the guitar to pitch

Intonate the guitar.

Loosen the claw, and remove the block.

Loosen the claw until the guitar is in pitch.

It's the easiest and fastest way to intonate a floating tremolo guitar.
 

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THIS sort of thing is why I wish I wasn't too lazy to install the Tremol-no system into all my floaters.
 

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Changing intonation changes trem angle. You're not finished until that's fixed. So what was the point of blocking it anyway?

I don't see the point of alot of these tricks because I'm so fast doing it old school like I always have.
 

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Rich, you have so much experience I'm sure you could do all of this blindfolded. I consider myself at least competent with guitar tech stuff, but my experience probably pales in comparison to what you have seen. The rest of us have to use some of these goofy little tricks to help us along the way.
 

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100% of the time I'm working on a new guitar during inspection prep for setup I'll intonate the high E and D string. When I pull the bridge to check/fix the arm holder spring and tighten the arm holder I'll set all the rest of the saddles based off where the E and D are. 95% of the time I never have to touch them again after the setup is finished. If I do, a turbo winder on a drill is your best friend.
 

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100% of the time I'm working on a new guitar during inspection prep for setup I'll intonate the high E and D string. When I pull the bridge to check/fix the arm holder spring and tighten the arm holder I'll set all the rest of the saddles based off where the E and D are. 95% of the time I never have to touch them again after the setup is finished. If I do, a turbo winder on a drill is your best friend.
Do you mean you set all the other saddles to the align flushly with the E & D? or you set the other saddles so they continue a linear line? thank you kind sage sir
 

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Am I the only one that makes set up blocks for my floyds? Put the block under the floyd where its at the proper angle, take a fine sharpie and mark the spring screws where they are FLUSH to the body, tighten the springs so the floyd base sits firmly on the block. From there you can intonate freely without worrying about the trem moving around. When youre done, tune it to pitch, lock it, then adjust the spring screws until you see the sharpie lines and then remove the block. You can use this trick for string changes too, so you can remove all the strings at once, although you really dont need to adjust the spring screws for that one.
 

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Do you mean you set all the other saddles to the align flushly with the E & D? or you set the other saddles so they continue a linear line? thank you kind sage sir
It's not linear, it's in the expected pattern to which trem. An edge the g sits a little further toward the headstock than a lo pro. I don't have any current pictures or I'd post them.

Am I the only one that makes set up blocks for my floyds? Put the block under the floyd where its at the proper angle, take a fine sharpie and mark the spring screws where they are FLUSH to the body, tighten the springs so the floyd base sits firmly on the block. From there you can intonate freely without worrying about the trem moving around. When youre done, tune it to pitch, lock it, then adjust the spring screws until you see the sharpie lines and then remove the block. You can use this trick for string changes too, so you can remove all the strings at once, although you really dont need to adjust the spring screws for that one.
Only one, no. There are enough Youtubers using blocks to block the trem. I find no advantage to it because I can do it faster my way, but those with little experience might find it easier, or if that's "your way" then you find it easier. Easier is always the way you're most familiar and proficient.
 

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Am I the only one that makes set up blocks for my floyds? Put the block under the floyd where its at the proper angle, take a fine sharpie and mark the spring screws where they are FLUSH to the body, tighten the springs so the floyd base sits firmly on the block. From there you can intonate freely without worrying about the trem moving around. When youre done, tune it to pitch, lock it, then adjust the spring screws until you see the sharpie lines and then remove the block. You can use this trick for string changes too, so you can remove all the strings at once, although you really dont need to adjust the spring screws for that one.
No, as I stated above, using tape to mark the claw's current position, blocking the tremolo makes it easier to intonate, but also removes any differences caused by the tremolo moving during the process.

Simply removing the block and tuning the strings to pitch using the springs, which should be right near the previous Mark.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Changing intonation changes trem angle. You're not finished until that's fixed. So what was the point of blocking it anyway?

I don't see the point of alot of these tricks because I'm so fast doing it old school like I always have.
I didn't block the tremolo at all and intonated just fine, but all I was doing was one string that was slightly not intonated
 

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Most of the time, I put guitar in playing position, press down tremolo bar with left hand to slack strings, holding alen key in my right hand and unlock saddle, move then lock again while keeping bar down.
 
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