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Seems to me that there is not much need for the 100-120watt monster tube amps with half stacks anymore.( At least for the local muscian) With PA or POD like gear, at every venue it seems over kill to have 200lbs of gear when you can run a 1x12 combo into a PA and sound just as good.

I have a 100watt head and it never gets played. I should probably sell it and get a better combo.
 

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depends on your situation. I prefer the older approach of analog gear and big tube amps. I'm not always opting for the 4x12 but it works out nice.
 

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I despise the idea of paying 4g's for a great tubed amp, then it not being as flexible as a 1g Line 6 unit.
Gear is a headache! If I was rich, it would be easier to get a great variety of sounds, but I'm not. haha. And probably never will be.
 

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There never was a reason for a local guy to have a 100 watt tube half stack. That's just too much amp for most places. I love my tube amps and have no desire to ever switch to a modeling unit. My low wattage tuba amps work great.
 

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I have gone through the phase of having all of the rack stuff. I still have a relatively flexible set-up that is portable and does a variety of things, but I really appreciate a good all around combo amp now. Never thought I would be happy with one, but I am.
 

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Tim Allen would not approve of this thread :)



Bring the power, baby.

I use a full stack every gig. Not that I need it, it just looks damn cool :)
 

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I have an old half stack, and it suits me fine. It is way too big of course, but it luckily sounds fine on low (and at 1/4 power). The thing about the digital stuff is it's always slowly moving to obsolesence in a way that's more noticeable than tube combos do. Everything goes obsolete, but digital modelers seem to go that route a lot faster. I'd have bought a Vetta head this year if I didn't think it would lose half it's value fairly quickly. I may still get a XT Live, though. They seem cool and flexible.
 

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I use a full stack every gig. Not that I need it, it just looks damn cool :)
It really does. I hate seeing cheap crate 212's on stage. You want to see big amps, the structure of a full stack and expensive tube heads. Especially at metal concerts.

It's not very practical, but people will think you are a cooler guitarist, even if you are not.

I guess you could make a lightwieght fake cabinet that folds for easy storage
 

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I guess you could make a lightwieght fake cabinet that folds for easy storage
..... maybe there's a market for inflatable fake quad boxes........?

ummm, personally, I settled on the TriAxis/Stereo 2:90 rig about five years ago, it's flexible enough to use anywhere, at any size of gig and sounds spectacularly good in a totally analog, non-modelling manner - sure, the whole lot weighs in at about 100 Kgs, but so what, at least lugging the stupid thing around helps keep the flab level semi-controllable...........
 

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You don't need to dump the head for a combo. I highly recommend a 1x12 cab or 2x12 and keeping the high powered head. True, you only mike one speaker, so why bother with a 4x12. Well, combos are fair, but a very good closed back cab will sound tighter and punchier. Seems like most combos are a compromise in power as well. A 100 watt head into a small closed back cab will sound better than a combo. You do not need a ton a stage volume. Most people run in-ears, so you do not need to monitor your own cab. Shure has the PSM200 in-ears witch sell for about $500, and work great. The very good thing about in-ears: no fatigue from the drummer, and you can hear yourself where ever you stand on the stage, or in the crowd. Before you dump your head, take it to the music store and plug it into a few cabs. If you run a small set up like this, you can still take your car to the gigs. Unless you have a huge trunk, you wont be driving your car with the 4x12 in the back.
 

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With the PA systems of today, there really isn't a reason for high wattage guitar amps. Back in the 70s and 80s, PAs couldn't faithfully send your signal out into the audience. Now they can, and sound men are wanting us to keep the volume down so they can control the sound better. At this point, the drums are the loudest thing on the stage that can't be controlled.

My how times change. I'm just happy that THD Hotplates and their ilk exist.
 

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got to agree about the pa systems . You can have a 15 watt tube combo and just mic it up and get amazing sound all night long . Back in the day usually the only thing miced was the vocals , so the amp had to be it's own pa meaning they were made to be as loud as they could be .

i have a 4x12 legacy cab , it is more to say i have a 4x12 legacy cab then anything because the cab is a bitch to take anywhere. It is about 100 pounds and is still hard to move around with casters on it . I also have a 100 watt mesa mark 3 , it just more to say i have a 100 watt mesa mark 3 .I can't get it past two before it is way too loud to be in the house .

Dont get me wrong i got that stuff to get great tone , but there are "smaller" ways to get great tone and still be able to have the volume in any situation .

I have never been happier with my gear or tone though. if your going to do something make it worth your time and be commited is all i got to say . :D
 

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Low wattage tube amps are the way to go :) Great tone, cheap to maintain, easy to carry.
Thats what I have been getting into recently. I have tried out the Epiphone Valve Junior Head, after it being recommended on here, and I loved it! The low-wattage Laney stuff is superb as well, both the LC15 and VC15 are great for the money.
But I love all the solidstate modelling stuff too. The Roland Cube series are awesome for the money. Everyone should have one for practising from time to time.

I agree with the thread. I think the Larger rigs are a thing of the past. But as people have said, it all depends on the size of the venue doesnt it. Metallica couldnt play Donnington using a 10-watt practise combo, lol. Stacks still have their use for regular gigging musicians. Just not at the home.
 

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I don't think the 4x12 cab will die anytime soon. All amps have their place. You're not going to take that 100 watt full stack into a bar that holds 50 people, just like you wouldn't take your 18 watt 1-12 combo to a stadium. I still prefer at least 50 watts whether it's into a 4x12 or 2x12 and will use a brake if volume level is a problem.
 

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What an interesting thread - well done.

I don't think the 4 X 12 cab will die anytime soon. We all grew up wanting a stack. When you finally save enough to be able to afford something decent you go with what you know works and sounds great - thats a stack.

All the amp modellers out there do just that, 'model an amp' - that being in 'most' circumstances the modelling of a cab/stack or combos of both etc. Amp modellers do have their place, however when it comes time to having/wanting a real sound during recording, the stack is the way to go!

Wolfram
 

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...And you can't experience that feeling with any other rig. (photo above)

Instruments and amps are tools for the creation of art. The size and air flow is just as big a part of the inspiration as the actual sound heard by the audience. Have scooters replaced V6 sedans? I will never own a scooter. It can't do what a car can. There are rocket cycles that will whup any car out there for speed and pickup, there are scooters that beat the best hybrid car for MPG's, it doesn't matter. There are modelers and preamps that fool 90% of the people 90% of the time, and quite frankly, a recorded JCM800 sound is one of the easiest to replicate IMO. Still it's not about that at all.

In my studio here, I do most of my work at low level and headphones. I swithch between and blend over a half dozen preamps. I still use three different miked cabinets, fairly loud for my "real deal" recorded tracks, and I don't/won't own a digital modeler because I can feel it immediately. Yes I've tried them all, and all their upgraded versions. If the next guy can't tell and/or doesn't care, then for him the large rig is dead. But you can't put a cranked 50 watt tube amp and a miked 12" speaker inside a digital box. Even if you fooled everybody, the guy playing the track can feel it.

And by the way I'm the king of getting good direct sounds, too. I go direct at church every week and the sound cranks. I know exactly how to simulate a miked cab with my gear for when I have to record direct. So I'm really in both camps when it comes to daily activities. That's why I can take such a strong stance against the death of the 50+ watt blasting tube amp rig. Because I'm "bi-ampual"!

I love/have owned low watt tube combos too. They're great! They CAN replace big heads and cabs, but they won't, because they can't move the air in such a way that the guitar actually responds to the soundwaves flowing through the air. Standing near a cranked half or full stack actually causes the sound waves to penetrate and shake the guitar in an acoustic fashion.
 

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There never was a reason for a local guy to have a 100 watt tube half stack. That's just too much amp for most places. I love my tube amps and have no desire to ever switch to a modeling unit. My low wattage tuba amps work great.
Well, for some people they swear the tone of a 100 watter, sounds better than a 50 watter. Some just like to have that extra headroom.
 

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Standing near a cranked half or full stack actually causes the sound waves to penetrate and shake the guitar in an acoustic fashion.
I used to mark the floor with tape at certain points near and around my amps to achieve different rates of feedback during a show. I did this during sound checks if I had the chance. Otherwise it was hit and miss and would even change slightly with a room full of people. I agree, you have to be moving air for it to occur though.
 
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