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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How does modifying an instrument lower its value? I'm about to my Ibanez 517 (sparkly blue), and when I get it I want to replace all three pickups (Tonezone, Blue Velvet, Air Norton), scallop the last four frets, and add a killswitch. I can do these perfectly without hurting the guitar, but am I going to ruin the instrument's resell value by doing these things? Thanks.
 

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I don't believe that it'll lower the value of the guitar if you make the modifications assuming that you do a GOOD scallop job and install the electronics properly. From what I've seen on "evilbay" people love to buy guitars that have already been modded to their liking. Of course, what's the point in modding a guitar if you plan on selling it? I say don't worry about the value and just enjoy the guitar.
 

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MrChadley said:
How does modifying an instrument lower its value? I'm about to my Ibanez 517 (sparkly blue), and when I get it I want to replace all three pickups (Tonezone, Blue Velvet, Air Norton), scallop the last four frets, and add a killswitch. I can do these perfectly without hurting the guitar, but am I going to ruin the instrument's resell value by doing these things? Thanks.
if you can do all these things perfectly. then you may gain money from the sale over what you could normally sell it for, but it probably wouldn't be mroe than what your costs to do it all would be. I agree with the above stated. Either mod it, keep it, and enjoy it, or just sell it now stock if you are at all planning on selling it.
 

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Guitars that typically lose value from modding are collectable. The 517 isn't really a collectable guitar, so knock yourself out. As has already been said though, you might only see 10 or 20 dollars of additional resale value for every 100 you put in it. For a sad example, I bought a Yellow 550 for 200 bucks. Gave it a refret for 140. By the time I had the guitar back together the refret wasn't straight, so it was another 250 to grind and polish and setup the guitar. Throw in maybe 80 bucks for a Bartolini V88c and Dimarzio Steve Morse, and my guitar is now worth maybe $225 :lol:
However, I love it, and I plan on keeping it forever.
 

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With mods you drastically narrow your prospective client base. If someone doesn't like the "Jem" scallops, they're gone! Pickups are always replaceable, and sometimes I'll overpay for a guitar with expensive pickups. Other times, I find I don't have to overpay, because whatever stupid Guitar Center/Sam Ash/etc. employees don't understand that the pups are worth some money. Stores usually view modded guitars as curses, because they know it narrows the audience. But with auctions and forums, you'll probably always be able to find someone that likes what you like.

Upon resale, I would definitely convert that killswitch to a coil cut. That would drastically broaden it's appeal. The sparkle finish chips and flakes like crazy. Be careful when drilling your killswitch hole, and be sure to countersink it afterwards! On both sides!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
frankfalbo said:
Upon resale, I would definitely convert that killswitch to a coil cut. That would drastically broaden it's appeal. The sparkle finish chips and flakes like crazy. Be careful when drilling your killswitch hole, and be sure to countersink it afterwards! On both sides!
What is countersinking?
 

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No bro, in your case it most likely will add value to the guitar as long as it's done pro ok just be carefull with it,
(countersinking is done after a hole is drilled with a drill size a bit bigger than the hole you drilled in the guitar, don't use a power drill when countersining a hole, spin the drill a few times by hand to get a nice finish around the hole you drill, tip is to use masking tape when drilling a hole & countersinking the hole, then be carefull when you remove the tape so you don't rip off any finish. you can buy a countersinking tool from a HomeDepo hardware store for a few dollars go chech it out bro.

Good Luck with it bro- Jake.
 

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Yes do NOT use a larger drill bit to countersink through the metal flake finish. Use a countersinking bit, preferably one with many "teeth" rather than one blade. It's just to make a clean transition from drill hole to paint, for now and in the future. When I drill a hole like that, I drill it undersized, countersink PAST the actual required size of the mini-toggle hole, then use a tapered reamer to open the hole to the right size. Non-chipped perfection every time!
 
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