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I can get a really good deal on an RG7xx - unfortunately, it has one of those hairline cracks behind the nut (see pic below). Is this a VERY bad thing ? Thanks in advance for the reactions and suggestions !
 

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to my untrained eye, it looks like the crack is not only between the two holes, but also running considerably down the neck from either side.

assuming it has been properly glued, it shouldn't pose any long term threat. mind you, it helps your bargaining position.
 

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I cracked my RG470 when it fell off it's stand (read almost snapped). If it hasn't already been repaired it's still no real big deal. as long as you get the cost of fixing it deducted from the purchase price. Once fixed it will probably be stronger than it was originally.
 

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Though it looks kind of nasty, it's not that bad.
I've fixed worse.
Go to Rich's page, he has a tutorial on how to fix these (the demo guitar he used was MUCH worse than this.

LonePhantom is right, often after the repair it's stronger than before it cracked as the glue is stronger than the wood.

If you can't feel the crack when rubbing your finger over it, and pressing on it doesn't seperate the wood, leave it be for now (if you buy it). I have an 1990 RG 550 with a crack right between the bolts and it's held up fine for more than 13 years with it. (I threw the guitar)
Like the old saying goes, "If it ain't broke . . ." ;)

Mic
 

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The tutorial will walk you through the repair and it lasts. It's very easy, and if you have any wood working experience, it's a snap. Biggest pain is waiting for the glue to dry. ;)

Good luck.

-R
 

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Would Rich's repairing technique work to repair a neck that had just a single small crack that ran perpindicular to the nut and was just on one side or the bolt hole? Because with a crack like that wouldn't the crack not be able to be spread?
 

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It's kind of hard to tell what you're talking about without a picture of the crack itself, but I think I have a good idea. If it's right next to the hole securing the locking nut, I'd just remove that locking nut bolt, put a small fulcrum under the neck, then secure the neck (face down, of course) to a 2x4, then place fulcrum under the nut (a standard No. 2 pencil is fine for this), then place a clamp with a stable pressure point on the headstock and very, very slowly and gently, apply pressure. That should spread that kind of crack wide open. Then smear some glue into the crack using a razor or a piece of mylar - something that'll be impervious to the glue - and then undo the clamp on the headstock, turn the neck over, and clamp it in the opposite direction very gently so as to push the crack closed. Wipe any excess glue away with a damp, lint free cloth.

24-hours later, just use some very gentle sandpaper (I'd start with 320~400 grit, then work my way up to 0000 steel wool before applying some tung oil or finish of your choice)[/i].

There's a hundred ways to ... for lack of a better way of putting it, "spread the crack". I have a bunch of small wood "chips" in various shapes and sizes that I've collected over the years that I use as fulcrums up against the neck to spread a cracked neck, whether it's longitudinal or transverse. Some are just a bigger pain than others to get them to open a little. The key is to never put so much pressure on the neck that you cause the crack to worsen.

When I started fixing these sorts of cracks for friends years ago, it was one of the website tutorials that got me started. Now I can take the worst crack (I've put entire headstocks back on that were broken clean off) and make the neck good as new. Just takes time, lots of patience, going slow, and never rushing. Once you have a feel for the procedure, there really isn't much you can't figure out with regards to reconstructive work on guitars.

-R
 

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That's a prime candidate for the procedure. Like I said, spread it very gently, apply the glue, clamp it the opposite way after wiping down the excess glue, sand and finish it the next day. Done. Easy. If that repair takes you more than an hour total time to fix, you've taken too much time to repair it.

Very simple to do. Once you've done one, you're pretty much an expert. 90% of the fixes I've done, you can't even tell there used to be a crack. Just be sure you clean the extra glue up and be careful not to let any extra glue remain in the hole for the locking nut bolt. If you do, and the glue hardens, just use a Dremel and a fine bit to clean up the dried glue in the hole.

-R
 

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damo7v said:
damn! i like that!

looks like a '550 with an ash body.
That's for sale. It was relisted cause nobody bid on it last time. If you like it you should go for it. I'm not interested in it I was just asking to try and learn. You can't get much better for $100 and I doubt anyone's gonna bid on it.
 
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