Ibanez JEM Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone, just posted a new video to my Axe Hacks YouTube channel on rosewood fretboard conditioning. I go over the method I typically use, as well as the use of Gorgomyte. If you dig the channel, you can subscribe HERE. The guitar in the vid is a cheapie Ibby RG :wink:

Enjoy!

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,641 Posts
Cool vid. I think I'd still do the 0000 treatment, but I usually give my axes to a tech for fretwork and just clean the boards with good ol elbow grease anyway. I might invest in some of this stuff for when the frets feel less than slick though.

I saw you did a review on brass blocks by the way - its a cool vid with some good tips, but your rationale as to why they work is flawed. I posted this on the video comments too, but I'll repeat it here -

GuitarBizarre said:
Can I just point out/clarify, the brass blocks DO work, (And the tungsten ones too) but not for the reasons you've stated?

You cannot "add" more sustain or resonance to an instrument like a guitar. The string is given a set amount of energy when struck. The only thing that can be done after this point to affect its sound, sustain, and harmonic content, is to change how much energy is then LOST through the other parts of the instrument, and how it is lost. The block has greater mass than the stock block, and therefore gives the bridge assembly greater inertia and slows the loss of energy through the spring system, resulting in greater sustain and a tonal change favouring the high frequencies and fundamental.

The Brass block's extra mass means the energy imparted to the string is NOT transferred through the bridge assembly into the springs and so on - exactly the opposite! Because the bridge has greater inertia, more of the energy remains in the string itself, and less is dissipated into the surrounding components. This is also why fixed bridges work better tonally than Tremolo bridges, and why a heavy guitar like a Les Paul sustains longer than a very light guitar like a danelectro - The bridge is completely unable to dissipate string energy anywhere except into the body. Since the mass of the heavy mahogany body is so great, very little energy is actually imparted into vibrating the wood, and more remains in the string.

If in doubt, consider things in this way - Energy is like water - it flows through the path of least resistance. In any system where energy is present, that energy will seek the easiest way to dissipate itself. The harder you make it for the energy to dissipate into another object as vibration (Bridge, bridge plate, springs, body mass, headstock due to lack of reinforcement for example on a tele headstock which is very weak, truss rod cavity etc), the more of that energy will remain in the string, and the longer it will stay in that string.
 

·
Vendor
Joined
·
26,427 Posts
You can use steel wool to cut playing glaze off a board every year or so, but cleaning regularly all you're doing is removing wood and will end up with mini scallops in no time. Much less, 0000 is not polishing frets and you now have scratches on the fret crowns running against string play. Bending will be scratchy until the strings polish the scratching out. Always follow lengthwise steel wool by masking and polishing the fret in the direction of the fret, then use 6000 micro mesh to actually polish the playing surface.

And never apply mineral oil like that, unless you want your fret slots oversaturated with oil. Apply to the wood surface only and keep pools away from the frets, only wiping it to the frets with a cloth.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top