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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,
This may be a stupid question, but, is it possible to sand down a neck to give it the same feel/thickness of a wizard 1? Example: I own a RG120, the neck feels really fat. I want it to feel like my RG750 (WAY THINNER!!!) Will I mess-up the neck? Do I just start sanding till it feels right? Or do I have to get a radius block? I did a search on those but they seem to be for frets. I searched this forum, but, all I found was how to take the sticky stuff off jems. I sure it an easy answer, pardon my ignorance.

Thanks,
Jon
 

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If you've ever done any woodwork, you'll have seen that it's REALLY easy to remove material quickly, and more to the point in this case to do it unevenly. Without any experience I'd expect you'd end up with a neck that had all kinds of "waves" in it, which isn't going to be nice.

I'd say just replace the neck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well, I have done some sanding, and it is an rg120, not exactly an expensive guitar :) I don’t play it right now anyways; I think I’ll give it a shot. I got to get experience somehow. I don’t think the guitar is worth a new or used neck. But just so I understand, most people use just sandpaper, nothing else?

Thanks for the quick reply,
Jon
 

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It's definitely possible to sand the thickness down to where you want it. Get a set of calipers and measure the thickness of the neck you want it to match at several points, then measure the neck you are about to sand at the same points, recording the differences, then block sand it, 'til it matches the thinner measurements.

Be careful and take your time, measuring intermittently as you go along. Remember, you can't put the wood back, so don't get carried away! ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
It's definitely possible to sand the thickness down to where you want it. Get a set of calipers and measure the thickness of the neck you want it to match at several points, then measure the neck you are about to sand at the same points, recording the differences, then block sand it, 'til it matches the thinner measurements.

Be careful and take your time, measuring intermittently as you go along. Remember, you can't put the wood back, so don't get carried away! ;)
Great Idea! thanks for the advice,
Jon
 

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It's definitely possible to sand the thickness down to where you want it. Get a set of calipers and measure the thickness of the neck you want it to match at several points, then measure the neck you are about to sand at the same points, recording the differences, then block sand it, 'til it matches the thinner measurements.

Be careful and take your time, measuring intermittently as you go along. Remember, you can't put the wood back, so don't get carried away! ;)
as long as the truss rod will allow....

do you know the truss rod measurements in the neck you are about to modify ?

sanding through to the truss rod = disaster.
 

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Wrap the sandpaper around a sanding block (a scrap of flat wood) instead of just your fingers and you shouldn't have any trouble keeping things even. You DO have to pay attention to where the truss rod is located, but I think you should be ok on this neck. You never want to have less than 1/8" between the rod and the back of the neck. Otherwise you can pretty much make it any shape and thickness you like. Of course, if you make it really thin, don't be suprised when it starts moving around more.
 

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If the 120 has the same profile as other imports, then you can remove some of the "shoulder" and get real close to the W1.

The imports seem to have a flatter back profile with more meat on the shoulders.

I hope that makes sense.
 

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I'd suggest using either a scraper to shave off some layers of wood or just using a half-round file(on the round side). Using sandpaper may leave high and low spots.
 

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All of my 7-strings get this treatment - I based the changes to my original UV7BK on the neck of the first UV I borrowed from my local dealer (I was encouraged to take it and try it out, and when I placed an order, I was told to just hang on to it until mine arrived from the distributor - just over a month I believe... ah, the good old days...).
That UV was a REALLY early PWH - it had (along with slightly microphonic pickups) an Edge-7 (whaletail) that was made using some cut-attached 6-string Edge parts (like the rear screw tension spring)... and it had a wildly flat, smaller profile. When my UV7BK arrived and I put my hand around the neck, I nearly cramped up, it was so much larger.
I took it home and re-shaped and oiled it... and all my others have been based on those dimensions.
I used to alter 6-string necks similarly, but I don't feel the need these days, as I'm a 7-string player 99% of the time - I don't notice the larger profiles on some 6-string necks so much any longer.

... that UVPWH is one of those 'ones that got away' - were I able, I would have taken that one, too...
 
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