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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After a bunch of thinking and changes in my life, I think I'm going to study abroad next year. Since I only speak English, I think I am stuck with going to a school in the UK. The UK prices are also the cheapest (not talking about "cheap" in general -- I'm talking about tuition, room, and board.)

Has anyone from the US done this? I'm not quite sure what I want to go into yet...most likely IT or something in the medical field. I think the experience of living in another country would be awesome, and I'd really like to get away from the place I've spent my entire life at, at least for a while to try new things. Thoughts?
 

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I didn’t have the opportunity nor am I knowledgeable about school accreditations though the idea to experience other cultures face-to-face (the web is a great information tool yet cannot capture the smells, feelings, etc.) sounds appealing.
 

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Great idea and the culture shock will help you study as you won't really have other options for the first 5-6 months.

Medicine - it's not the same so make sure you only do the undergrad here and residency in the US or else you would be stuck with re-taking a bunch of qualifications and doing 2 residencies (here and then back in the US).....
For everything else consider that on top of the annual tuition fees (£6,500 - £12,000 depending on what and where you study) you'll need at least £4,000 for room and at least as much for food and stuff so budget for at least £8,000 annual living expenses.

ilia
 

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Sudying in Canada is cheaper than in the UK, but for an American it might be a better experience to move to Europe. And, as Andre said, many schools, in Scandinavia in particular, but also elsewhere in Europe (even Poland) offer programmes taught in english.
 

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Sounds like a great idea. If you want to do it, do it now because you're not likely to get another chance.

As far as the field, I'd avoid medicine unless it's something you really want to do. Someone who nows more than me may want to jump in here, but I'm sure med school is a long commitment, tack on the residency, and then if you end up not really loving your particular discipline it could be miserable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the posts. I don't really want to go into medicine, because as mentioned it's a big commitment. I am in my first year of college now, and my declared major is IT. I don't really want to go into IT either, but it's what I'm good at. Declaring your major your first year doesn't really mean much anyway, since I'm only taking 3 credit hours of IT courses, and 12 hours of general education courses. Next year is still mainly going to be general education courses (at least it would be if I continued education in the US.)

As far as costs go, I found this thing called ISEP that handles international students through my university. Looking at this page:

http://www.isep.org/direct/uk05.html

... You can see that tuition, room, and board are all around $10,000. The university that I think would best suit my needs is the University of Sunderland. They offer many IT and technology courses, and they said the cost of living there is lower than the rest of the UK. Anyways, more thoughts and comments are definitely appreciated, especially if you've gone to or been around Sunderland.
 

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Well, I'd do it. Moving away to another country to study was one of the best things i did for my own independance and worldview.

Secondly the UK may be a good place to study, but if you are spending all that money try and get the best taught course or best recognised university that you can, but in any case the degree result will matter more.

And yes, the culture shock will definately do a lot for your outlook on life, and will be something cool that employers will look at very favourably when you finish.

Also, it may be worth looking into combining IT with a european language, and see if that is a possibility. If you do a course in the UK then also look into 4 year courses that include a year in a different university in europe as part of the course.

Lastly, remember that if you do study abroad it'll be a wonderfull way to see lots of europe cheaply and gain a different view of the world, which will be very very cool.

And idf it costs about the same as tuition in the states then I'd go for it, everything to gain not much to lose!
 

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Oh and yes, do look into other courses. Pick something you enjoy, and then see if it is combined with something you are good at. For example if you could marry a hobby and interest with IT then you would come out with something you are ultimately interested in! There are loads of courses ( www.ucas.co.uk is the UK application service for universities so they have a list of all courses nationwide) so definately have a look through them all and see if there is something you like.

After that choose a general area where you wont mind spending 3-4 years of your life studying. Some universities are a bit out of the way, and as you are over from america it would be a shame to have one that is so far out of town that it is impossible to get anywhere, and remember cities are a lot smaller so you should decide if you want countryside or inner city life.

Having said that if you decide to do it, you'll have something exciting to look forward to!

And learn to like tea and talk about the weather. it's mandatory.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
First off, tuition is going to be waaaaay more if I study abroad. Right now, my tuition costs $1500 per semester. I got scholarships and grant money, so all of my tuition, books, going to lunch occassionally is paid for. And I still have $1000 left over per semester.

With studying abroad, I'm sure I'll still get some scholarships and grant money, but I'm definitely going to have to take out a loan. I'm not sure if I'm going to stay in the UK for more than a year, because $10,000 per year quickly adds up, and I'm not too keen on the idea of owing $40,000 to someone when I step out into the world. That is, of course, unless the excitement and opportunities of Europe are just too cool and I think going there for more than a year would benefit me.

Also...I'm not really "moving to the UK and going to school." I plan on doing study abroad through my current university, and I guess I'm limited to certain schools as listed on the link I posted above. I'm not positive on this, but that is the way I interpret things. I'm not sure if I'll really be able to get a degree in what I REALLY want (I'm not even sure what I really want yet) going to those universities. Don't colleges and universities in the UK have some sort general studies courses that you must take for any degree?

I know things are generally more expensive in the UK, but what are flight ticket prices like? Since the UK is an island, I would imagine that are relatively reasonable since travelling my boat is somewhat slow.

Lastly, and this is just for curiosity, do people in the UK usually refer to their country as "the UK"? I never really hear a true British person saying "England," nor do you even hear "(Great) Britain" much.
 

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fettouhi said:
1500 per semester, WOW. I'm paying 200 € per semester at the moment, back home at my old university I paid nothing.
Yeah, Germany is pretty cheap; I paid EUR 250,- for a semester at the Hochschule Niederrhein (Krefeld). Back here in The Netherlands all the University tuitions are the same; about EUR 1500,- per academic year, they will be variable in the future though.

For me, I studied as a European (Dutch) in another European country (Germany), and I received a few nice extra scholarships to encourage studying abroad. I went there for two years so I even learned the language quite well.

I can only recommend you studying abroad; it's much fun and life experience :) I will do it again sometime in the next few years I think, but this time I'll go really FAR away.
 

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I've been abroad for 3 years and it is a good experience. You learn a lot of new things, meet new people etc. I would suggest go for it if you think that you need some change in your life.

Regards

André
 

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There are great Universities in Ireland as well, and I've known a few New Yorkers who went over there to study. They all loved the experience and got fine educations as well.
 
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