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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just went to my trusty luthier to have my acoustic set up. We saw that the belly bulge at the bridge area is substantially bigger than it used to be and said that my case is irrepairable and the only remedy left for me is to go to a lower gauge string set (11s down to 10s) to prolong the life of my steel string acoustic, but playability is now compromised.

I was thinking of switching to a nylon classical guitar so I would have my hassles lessened.

The question is, are nylon classical guitars less maintenance-conscious than steel-string guitars? I don't usually perform with acoustics so tone and dynamics are out of the question. Or does it have the same headaches as steel stringers like belly bulge, rusting stuff, etc?

thank you!
 

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I grew up playing classicals - nylon string guitars. They are like Apples and Oranges to an steel string acoustical guitar let alone an electric, let alone an ibanez, let alone a jem.

Yes there's less string tension, but their action is notoriously higher even on high end Ramirez, etc. Their strings need replacing more often than steel as they go dead terribly, and their squeek drives me nuts in the studio. I was taught to use a bunch of fingersleaze just to get it to quiet down in conservatory!

Go play one, you'll see what I am saying. It's a different instrument, played in a different way for different music.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I grew up playing classicals - nylon string guitars. They are like Apples and Oranges to an steel string acoustical guitar let alone an electric, let alone an ibanez, let alone a jem.

Yes there's less string tension, but their action is notoriously higher even on high end Ramirez, etc. Their strings need replacing more often than steel as they go dead terribly, and their squeek drives me nuts in the studio. I was taught to use a bunch of fingersleaze just to get it to quiet down in conservatory!

Go play one, you'll see what I am saying. It's a different instrument, played in a different way for different music.
What about maintenance like action, intonation, the dreaded belly bulge, etc?
 

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There are no adjustments (nut and saddle one time setup basically). You switch for tone and style not maintenance.

Like Blue said it's apples vs oranges. Including sound & tone. 52mm-ish nut, flat board, no inlays, etc. Nylon strings are simply fantastic to play (i took ensemble and lessons during college decades ago) and I've owned a few. Just very different from a steel string, meant to be played sitting (classical position w/ footrest).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
There are no adjustments (nut and saddle one time setup basically). You switch for tone and style not maintenance.

Like Blue said it's apples vs oranges. Including sound & tone. 52mm-ish nut, flat board, no inlays, etc. Nylon strings are simply fantastic to play (i took ensemble and lessons during college decades ago) and I've owned a few. Just very different from a steel string, meant to be played sitting (classical position w/ footrest).
I understand all points, thank you very much. I pretty much like the feel of a nylon as I use my electric guitar primarily for heavy metal stuff. Also, maybe I'm quite hyped up for a nylon since I've only owned a steel-string acoustic my entire life, maybe a little change could shaken up my musical interest a bit.

Plus, plucking is glorious on nylons. And I like the strumming w/ pick tones with it lol. Maybe I'm just a bit of a rebel?
 

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Fully agree with you. I would love to trade my Seagull steel-string for an equal value nylon string. My current nylon is a ~91 takamine (Korean) cutaway with electronics removed by the original store (ken stanton music) huge discount & all i could afford at the time - it's served me well but a change would motivate me to use it more.
 

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I'm not a big player of nylon but initially had a proper Spanish Classical guitar.

After getting a Euphoria EP10 steel string acoustic and finding that so much more comfortable with the thin body and nice electric like neck (i.e closer to my Ibanez Electrics) I decided to look for a similar nylon guitar.

I ended up with an ibanez GA35TCE (also thinline and closer to electric specs) which after sorting some sharp fret edges and fitting some nice d'addario strings rather than the stock ones is really nice - in fact I can't believe how good for the price compared to what a steel string would cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Is the Ibanez GA15 good? That's the most affordable option I have and I'm a huge Ibanez fanboy lol

Does that thing have a truss rod?
 

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I've got one of the GAs and yes it has a truss rod. Besides a few minor quality control issues, mostly aesthetic, it plays really well.
 
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