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You have to listen to it. Check out Di Meola and Gambale and John McLaughlin. Learn some of their lines. Analyze them. Learn how they're applied and practice practice practice. It all boils down to knowing where to play the right "wrong" notes. Theory!!! Learn it!! Love it!!!! Live it!!!!!
 

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Before jumping into the theory, or if youre not commited enough too at all, learn some moore or holdsworth or di meola etc riffs that sound cool too you and mix them up a bit and use them in different scales and modes or change the phrasing slightly and you can create something of your own that you can use.

You can hear petrucci do this alot on his solo album and when he's just improving, anywahere where its not essential for him to create something of his owm, he uses bits and peices of other peoples styles so he can make something that sounds very pleasing just by rsiting old licks and without having to sit down and write it.

a good example is the G3 version of the glassgow kiss solo. On the DT albums its important that he creates things of his own that are well written but in a situation like G3, its not that important.
 

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There are free jazz lessons all over the internet. Of all the styles out there, jazz might be the easiest to pick up over the internet. Free up an hour this weekend and do some exploring. And get a Jimmy Bruno CD, like "Burnin" or something. He's psycho fast, which most folks here seem to like :D
 

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Learn to play over chord changes, not over any particular changes necessarily, for starters just get used to having to change key centres. Familiarise yourself with various 7th chords, maybe get some sheet music for some simple jazz standards, that should help you get more comfortable with this style.

Then, to get the "feel", listen to the greats. Not only guitarists, try great horn players like Contrane, Parket, Shorter etc...

For the record, I thought that that improv bit in the clip you posted was rather weak. Vinnie is a great player, but not much of a jazzer it seems. I think Greg Howe is a much better example of something you might want to do IMO.
 

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The first thing I would recommend you is to get more acquainted with the music
Become a good listener first, feel the music, go to as many performances as you can. I am blessed to live in Chicago where there are tons of performances all the time and a lot of them are free!!! By listening and jamming with musicians who are into Jazz will be the best way IMHO to learn the music. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Yes I also live in Chicago and am blessed with performances. And I do know theory a little, Im starting to get good at it. And I have good technique.
 

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That should be a good start then - get comfortable with playing over changes and then, like most guys in this thread said, listen, listen, and listen....
 

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The first thing I would recommend you is to get more acquainted with the music
Become a good listener first, feel the music, go to as many performances as you can. I am blessed to live in Chicago where there are tons of performances all the time and a lot of them are free!!! By listening and jamming with musicians who are into Jazz will be the best way IMHO to learn the music. :D
I agree with Olie. Jazz is a great genre and the music is quite impressive from a technique and listening perspective. Don't be afraid to go to the store and buy a Wes Montgomery cd. Once you start listening to him and other players like Lee Ritenour, you won't want to listen to anything else.

Jimmy
 
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