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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I have a white Ibanez Jem 7v since 17 years ago and it is starting to yellow. In the 1st pic the white is fading. Notice in the second pic that the edge is a bit yellow and a bit rough, and in the third pic notice the difference in color tone, one part is starting to look more ivory. Is this normal?. The guitar is always kept in its case.
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It's definitely normal for them to yellow where you are in contact with it. It's the natural oils in your skin. It's most noticable on white instruments. Like mine here, you can see severe yellowing where my picking arm lays (bottom left in the picture). Since Ibanez uses urethane it take a bit more time than lacquer... But it's definitely normal. This also happens if it is exposed to UV light. But it's faster that way.

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
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[/QUOTE]Wow, your guitar also has some ivory color. Why do the edge of my guitar that is colored ivory feels rough?, can it be the finish that is braking down or something?
It's definitely normal for them to yellow where you are in contact with it. It's the natural oils in your skin. It's most noticable on white instruments. Like mine here, you can see severe yellowing where my picking arm lays (bottom left in the picture). Since Ibanez uses urethane it take a bit more time than lacquer... But it's definitely normal. This also happens if it is exposed to UV light. But it's faster that way.
 

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Mine feels rough as well. It's probably a slow errosion of the clear coat. I know that's what mine is. It's normal wear and tear for an old guitar. Gives it character! Just look at evo, flo and the other Jem's Steve uses. If you look just below the high E string on my guitar it has worn through the finish to the mahogany.
 

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Just like age ravages us eventually, age impacts inanimate objects as well. ;) You don't have it sealed in a hermetic chamber, air and everything else gets in, and you're using it somewhat regularly I'd imagine. It's going to show subtle signs of age, wear, fade, regardless of how well you treat it.
 

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Notice in the second pic that the edge is a bit yellow and a bit rough, and in the third pic notice the difference in color tone, one part is starting to look more ivory. Is this normal?.
Perfectly normal. I have a 90's Jackson soloist that was nicknamed to "pee stain" because of similar but heavier yellowing.
 

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A lot can attack the clearcoat on a finish, and of course white being the color underneath, it will show every bit of discoloration. The earlier 7V's, made in 1998-2002 were said to have a UV resistant clearcoat to prevent premature yellowing, that being said, it isn't perfect, and I wonder if Ibanez ditched that later in the 2000s. Only Rich would likely know this :D

Anyway, it's not just UV light that causes finishes to yellow, radical oxygen species in the air, light, heat, tobacco smoke (ok, that's obvious), I will always say this, all white painted instruments will yellow over time, it's the nature of the beast. If I buy white guitars, I tend to buy pearl/eggshell colors that are already closer to an off-white. That being said, many people would consider the natural yellowing process as a source of pride, coming from a vintage/survivor guitar mindset. Yellowing doesn't really bother me on guitars, well, until it gets into that almost green-ish yellow tone. I'd consider it the fruits of having an older guitar that has aged well, but not been abused and beat up.

For curiosity's sake, I wonder if anyone has used "retro-brite" (or Salon Care 40 hydrogen peroxide solution) to bring old guitars back to pure white? I know that it's done ALL the time with old light switches, Nintendo's, computer cases and electronics. I'd think that it would work really well on guitars, but then, who is willing to try it :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
A lot can attack the clearcoat on a finish, and of course white being the color underneath, it will show every bit of discoloration. The earlier 7V's, made in 1998-2002 were said to have a UV resistant clearcoat to prevent premature yellowing, that being said, it isn't perfect, and I wonder if Ibanez ditched that later in the 2000s. Only Rich would likely know this :D

Anyway, it's not just UV light that causes finishes to yellow, radical oxygen species in the air, light, heat, tobacco smoke (ok, that's obvious), I will always say this, all white painted instruments will yellow over time, it's the nature of the beast. If I buy white guitars, I tend to buy pearl/eggshell colors that are already closer to an off-white. That being said, many people would consider the natural yellowing process as a source of pride, coming from a vintage/survivor guitar mindset. Yellowing doesn't really bother me on guitars, well, until it gets into that almost green-ish yellow tone. I'd consider it the fruits of having an older guitar that has aged well, but not been abused and beat up.

For curiosity's sake, I wonder if anyone has used "retro-brite" (or Salon Care 40 hydrogen peroxide solution) to bring old guitars back to pure white? I know that it's done ALL the time with old light switches, Nintendo's, computer cases and electronics. I'd think that it would work really well on guitars, but then, who is willing to try it :D
My Ibanez Jem is a 2005 and it is starting to to turn into ivory color, it still has a few parts in the original white color.
 
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