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P'tit lu all...

Plan to made my own assembly of Ibanez gears to have a VG99 dedicated Ibanez guitar w/out magnetic pickups, only a Graphtech or similar system. But I don't want another vibrato as the Double Edge on its instrument.
It's really hard to find a DE.

Thank you for answer if you sale one.
 

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I looked for a Double Edge for a while without luck. What I did instead was install a set of Graph Tech Ghost Floyd Rose saddles on an original Edge tremolo. They work very well, but there are a few minor complications that you have to address.

First, each saddle has a small wire for the piezo insert that runs out the bottom of the saddle. Those wires need to get to the control cavity, and must do so without being crushed between the saddle and the baseplate that the saddles sit on. Graph Tech recommends having holes milled into the baseplate to allow the wires to run through. However, I found a simpler solution, which I’ll share in a moment.

The second complication is getting the proper radius on the saddles. With the Edge, all the saddles are the same height, but the baseplate is staggered to create the string radius to match the radius of the fretboard (430mm by default, if I recall correctly). In contrast, the Floyd Rose has a flat baseplate, and the saddles themselves are three different heights to create the radius (also 430mm, I believe). So, if you put the taller Ghost saddles in the middle, the radius will be too arched, and if you put the taller saddles towards the outside, it will be essentially flat/no radius.

My solution to both of these problems was to use shims. Specifically, I made some shims from aluminum cans. It is about .1mm thick, so just make enough to stack on top of one another for each saddle to create the proper radius. I cut a slot or channel into the shims (so that it looks a bit like a U) for the piezo wire to run through – the saddles rest on the shims, and the wire runs underneath. I used 3 shims even on the shortest saddles so that the saddles don’t put pressure on the piezo wires. I then feed the piezo wires out the back of the tremolo, through the bottom of the slots for the string lock screws (the long ones that stick out through the back of the tremolo). From there, they run behind the sustain block and through a hole I drilled into the control cavity. The wires are essentially invisible unless you know where to look and look VERY closely, and don’t get pinched or bound anywhere along the way.

A third complication is that, because the Ghost saddles are all taller than the Edge saddles, plus the addition of the shims, the action will initially be much higher. On most guitars, this can probably be remedied easily enough by simply adjusting the studs so that the bridge sits lower. That worked for me. Alternatively, you could probably shim the neck so that it sits up higher. One potential consequence of dropping the bridge height is that you may lose a little pull-up range before the back end of the tremolo hits the body. I still get plenty for my needs – from 1 full-step to 2.5 steps, depending on the string. This is on an ’87 Radius, which I believe has a shallower route than most younger guitars, so most guitars would probably have more pull-up range even after the mod. If needed, one could always make a deeper route for the back of the tremolo.

A final potential snag is that the strings contact the saddle closer to the front of the Ghost saddle, as compared the Edge saddles where the contact point is further back. This means that the saddle will need to be locked down further to the back of the tremolo. I still had enough room to get proper intonation, although a couple of saddles were close to running out of room (you can only shift them so far back before they hit the sloped portion of the tremolo). But, every guitar is different, so it seems conceivable that one could run out of room and not be able to achieve perfect intonation. My original saddles were fairly far back themselves (a near worst-case scenario), and it was still ok with the Ghost saddles, so I suspect most guitars would be just fine. But if your Edge saddles are already back about as far as possible (string nearly as long as possible), then you may run out of room with the Ghost saddles.

Despite several potential complications, it’s actually a pretty straightforward modification once you know what to do. It works great and looks good too. If you already have an original Edge, it’ll only cost you the ~$140 (US) for the Ghost saddles. Used Edges can often be found for around $100. So, the saddles plus a used Edge would probably cost you less than a Double Edge, should you eventually find one. Takes some tinkering to get everything set up, but given your plans I don’t think that’ll be an obstacle (I found the whole process to be quite fun).

A final note -- all of this only applies to an original Edge. I don't think the Ghost saddles will work at all on a Lo-Pro Edge or Edge Pro, or at least not without an entirely different set of complications and workarounds.

Hope this helps!
 
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